Definition of participle in English:

participle

Syllabification: par·ti·ci·ple
Pronunciation: /ˈpärdəˌsip(ə)l
 
/

noun

Grammar
A word formed from a verb (e.g., going, gone, being, been) and used as an adjective (e.g., working woman, burned toast) or a noun (e.g., good breeding). In English, participles are also used to make compound verb forms (e.g., is going, has been). Compare with gerund.
More example sentences
  • Intransitive, transitive, causative forms, past and non-past tenses (there was no future tense in Old Tamil), participal and verbal nouns, adjectival participles and the infinitive are found in the language of the inscriptions.
  • Moreover, nouns express sorts of things, verbs and participles are tensed, pronouns are either demonstrative or relative.
  • The end of the previous sentence itself contains an absolute clause with the participle being as its verb.

Origin

late Middle English: from Old French, by-form of participe, from Latin participium '(verbal form) sharing (the functions of a noun)', from participare 'share in'.

Derivatives

participial

Pronunciation: /ˌpärtəˈsipēəl/
adjective
More example sentences
  • I think there is a tension between the participial and noun forms worth exploring-for the terms determine how teachers and students alike encounter the phenomenon of writing.
  • Likewise, the participial suffix ‘ado’ is often changed by Puerto Ricans.
  • The construction is the same - a participial phrase introduces the story, the spin commences before the news arrives - but the similarities end there.

participially

Pronunciation: /ˌpärtəˈsipēəlē/
adverb

Definition of participle in:

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Pronunciation: ˈflipənt
adjective
not showing a serious or respectful attitude