There are 2 definitions of peak in English:

peak1

Syllabification: peak
Pronunciation: /pēk
 
/

noun

1The pointed top of a mountain: the snowy peaks rose against the blue of a cloudless sky
More example sentences
  • It winds up through rolling hills with stands of poplar trees, distant views of lakes and snowy mountain peaks strung along the horizon.
  • The visitor is mesmerized by its sunny beaches, snowy mountain peaks, endless plains where black bulls graze, shimmering lakes and mountain streams.
  • How it ended up on the peak of a snowy mountain (located over a crocodile lake and through a blue tunnel) is a question we'll have to save for another day.
Synonyms
1.1A mountain, especially one with a pointed top: the rocky outcrops of peaks such as the Cassongrat offer a challenge to rock climbers
More example sentences
  • The highest peak is Mount Apo in Mindanao at 9,689 feet.
  • The over 100 volcanic peaks in the range, some over 3,000 metres in elevation, include more than a dozen which are considered active.
  • Where the White Mountains come to an end is the great peak of Mount Mindolluin.
Synonyms
1.2A projecting pointed part or shape: whisk 2 egg whites to stiff peaks
More example sentences
  • Trim to a triangular shape, leaving the peak as high as possible.
  • Every tree seems to me to be shaped as a peak uniquely designed for the very spot it stands in.
  • The shapes of the peaks are broader and less asymmetric.
1.3A point in a curve or on a graph, or a value of a physical quantity, higher than those around it: a slight increase in velocity provides a second peak on the general velocity curve
More example sentences
  • What happens in all these cases is that a small number of CDs or whatever sell in enormous quantities, forming a peak on the graph.
  • The inset shows the second differential curves calculated from peaks 7 and 8 of the quinone spectra.
  • As expected, loop regions show more motion than helical regions, which is reflected in the larger deviations from the starting point as indicated by peaks in the graph.
1.4The point of highest activity, quality, or achievement: anyone who saw Jones at his peak looked upon genius
More example sentences
  • But as time passed, he no longer was at his peak, and the quality of his troops declined, while his enemies had learned their lessons.
  • At their peak, cassette sales alone brought in an estimated $50 million annually.
  • At his peak he was almost unstoppable and only the quality of competition limited his Scotland appearances to two.
Synonyms
height, high point/spot, pinnacle, summit, top, climax, culmination, apex, zenith, crowning point, acme, capstone, apogee, prime, heyday
1.5chiefly British A stiff brim at the front of a cap.
More example sentences
  • Kitted out in his team-issue polo shirt, the peak of his baseball cap shading his outdoor complexion, short sleeves revealing the power in his forearms still.
  • A ponytail of strawberry blond hair hung casually below the reversed peak of her baseball cap.
  • In addition there was a fellow in a brown bowler hat, another in a shapeless cloth cap with a peak, and both added their encouragements, turning to Waistcoat in a laconic collusion.
Synonyms
1.6The narrow part of a ship’s hold at the bow or stern.
More example sentences
  • It looked like an ornament, like something at the front peak of a ship, a statue of some sort.
1.7The upper, outer corner of a sail extended by a gaff.

verb

[no object] Back to top  
Reach a highest point, either of a specified value or at a specified time: its popularity peaked in the 1940s the rate of increase peaked at 34 percent last autumn
More example sentences
  • In 1980, the suicide rate in Denmark peaked and reached a level that was among the highest in the world, with 34 suicides per 100 000 inhabitants.
  • Values for vineyards peaked in 2000 in the range of $85,000 to $180,000 per acre, but sales activity in 2003 was virtually nil.
  • Farther out, some see rates peaking at 5.25 per cent in the first half of 2005.
Synonyms
reach its height, climax, reach a climax, come to a head

adjective

[attributive] Back to top  
1Greatest; maximum: he did not expect to be anywhere near peak fitness until Christmas
More example sentences
  • Actually, yes, it is possible to hold a high, but not peak, level of fitness for a long time.
  • PC manufacturers developed state-of-the-art thermal solutions to ensure that notebooks run at the peak performance level under normal conditions.
  • The text is addressed to all performers, athletes, business people, trial lawyers and anyone else who needs guidance on how to work at their peak performance level.
Synonyms
1.1Characterized by maximum activity or demand: at peak hours, traffic speeds are reduced considerably
More example sentences
  • The facility's energy strategies will result in a 67 percent reduction in electric energy use during peak demand hours.
  • People will use their cars less as a result, reducing air pollution, decreasing traffic congestion and lessening peak period demands on public transport.
  • The plan also calls on employers to consider introducing flexi-times, so that the effect of the peak demand by traffic on the road network can be diluted.

Origin

mid 16th century: probably a back-formation from peaked, variant of dialect picked 'pointed'.

Usage

See peek (usage)

Derivatives

peakiness

noun

Definition of peak in:

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Word of the day apposite
Pronunciation: ˈapəzit
adjective
apt in the circumstances or relation to something

There are 2 definitions of peak in English:

peak2

Syllabification: peak
Pronunciation: /
 
pēk/

verb

[no object] archaic
Decline in health and spirits; waste away.

Origin

early 17th century: of unknown origin. The phrase peak and pine derives its currency from Shakespeare.

Definition of peak in: