There are 2 definitions of peep in English:

peep1

Syllabification: peep
Pronunciation: /pēp
 
/

verb

[no object]
1Look quickly and furtively at something, especially through a narrow opening: the door was ajar and she couldn’t resist peeping in
More example sentences
  • We peeped through the window of an old-fashioned apothecary.
  • Scarlet ran over to inspect as did Griffith and they peeped through to see Lane on the phone with someone.
  • She locked the bullet into the barrel, peeped through the scope, aimed, and instantaneously pulled the trigger, expelling the bullet into the air.
Synonyms
look quickly, cast a brief look, take a secret look, sneak a look, (have a) peek, glance
informal take a gander
1.1 (peep out) Be just visible; appear slowly or partly or through a small opening: a wad of money that was peeping out of his pocket the sun began to peep out
More example sentences
  • Spring in Connecticut brings rain and daffodils and tulips begin to peep out from piles of dirty snow.
  • His eyes traced over me, taking in my disheveled hair and my toes, which were peeping out from underneath my dress.
  • I regarded my toes as they peeped out of the water while I floated on my back.
Synonyms
appear (slowly/partly), show, come into view/sight, become visible, emerge, peek, peer out

noun

[usually in singular] Back to top  
1A quick or furtive look: Jonathan took a peep at his watch
More example sentences
  • A quick peep at my watch told me that the time was 6.30 a.m. and across in the other bed, just visible through the mosquito nets, J.R. was still sleeping soundly.
  • The bigger kids said it was haunted so it was obviously too much of a temptation for any 10 year old not to take a quick peep through the window.
  • New chaps would have a quick peep over the top, just for a moment - but only if they didn't know anything.
Synonyms
quick look, brief look, (sneak) peek, glance
informal gander, squint
1.1A momentary or partial view of something: black curls and a peep of gold earring

Origin

late 15th century: symbolic; compare with peek.

Definition of peep in:

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Word of the day setose
Pronunciation: ˈsēˌtōs
adjective
bearing bristles or setae; bristly

There are 2 definitions of peep in English:

peep2

Syllabification: peep
Pronunciation: /
 
pēp/

noun

1A high-pitched feeble sound made by a young bird or mammal.
More example sentences
  • It starts off with three or four high-pitched peeps in rather quick succession; then the bird launches into a raspy, guttural shriek; and then the bird whistles a few warbling notes as a coda.
  • New moms and dads everywhere respond to shrill baby peeps with excited nods and bows, carefully clearing away eggshell shards from around fragile hatchlings tucked between their feet.
  • He listened to the raucous calls of the bigger birds, the peeps and chucks of the smaller birds.
Synonyms
cheep, chirp, chirrup, tweet, twitter, chirr, warble
1.1 [with negative] A slight sound, utterance, or complaint: not a peep out of them since shortly after eight
More example sentences
  • Especially since we never hear a peep of complaint about the millions of dollars of research funded by the Natural Sciences and Engineering Research Council of Canada.
  • We didn't hear another peep from them all week.
  • And, I don't want to hear one peep from you about it either.
Synonyms
sound, noise, cry, wordcomplaint, grumble, mutter, murmur, grouse, objection, protest, protestation
informal moan, gripe, grouch
1.2 (usually peeps) North American informal A small sandpiper or similar wading bird.
More example sentences
  • In the natural world, peeps are sandpipers, pure and simple.
  • For the peeps and plovers dancing in the surf, we had no time at all.
  • The Semipalmated Sandpiper is a small shorebird in the group known as peeps or stints.

verb

[no object] Back to top  
Make a cheeping or beeping sound.
More example sentences
  • He jumped all over her shoulders and her head and sailed around her in circles, squawking and peeping his joy.
  • There will come a day three months from now when the sun is shining, the birds peep delight, the air smells rich and green, and I'll sigh in delight: again, again, at last.
  • Quicker than a blink, she stuffs it into her claw, peeps once or twice, then picks it up again and eats a bit more, scraping delicately against the branch to push it into her mouth.

Origin

late Middle English: imitative; compare with cheep.

Definition of peep in: