Share this entry

Share this page

philopatric

Syllabification: phil·o·pat·ric
Pronunciation: /ˌfiləˈpatrik
 
/

Definition of philopatric in English:

adjective

Zoology
(Of an animal or species) tending to return to or remain near a particular site or area.
Example sentences
  • The fact that close inbreeding is rarely observed even in highly philopatric species suggests that animals have mechanisms to avoid breeding with close kin.
  • Most individuals are philopatric; they return to the area near where they hatched to breed.
  • Like other waterfowl species, common goldeneye females are natal and breeding site philopatric.

Origin

1940s: from philo- 'liking' + Greek patra 'fatherland' + -ic.

Derivatives

philopatry

1
Pronunciation: /fəˈläpətrē/
noun
Example sentences
  • For colonial seabirds, studies of natal dispersal are numerous, and two levels of natal philopatry have been recognized: philopatry to the natal colony and within the colony philopatry to the natal breeding site.
  • First-time breeders that came back to breed within their natal colony showed strong philopatry toward their natal breeding sites.
  • The name for this stay-at-home behavior is philopatry, a term derived from the Greek for ‘home-loving’ and loosely defined as the tendency of an individual to remain in its birthplace as an adult.

Definition of philopatric in:

Share this entry

Share this page

 

What do you find interesting about this word or phrase?

Comments that don't adhere to our Community Guidelines may be moderated or removed.

Get more from Oxford Dictionaries

Subscribe to remove ads and access premium resources

Word of the day emulous
Pronunciation: ˈemyələs
adjective
seeking to emulate or imitate someone or something