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premonition

Syllabification: pre·mo·ni·tion
Pronunciation: /ˌprēməˈniSH(ə)n
 
, ˌpreməˈniSH(ə)n
 
/

Definition of premonition in English:

noun

A strong feeling that something is about to happen, especially something unpleasant: he had a premonition of imminent disaster
More example sentences
  • I had strong premonitions of doom, the unmistakable feeling I was walking into a trap.
  • The prince searches for her through the white night of St. Petersburg, his mind full of confusion, premonitions and anxiety, as on the eve of an attack.
  • A chill, in accordance with all the cliches about premonitions and fears, went up my spine. I got up on the counter.
Synonyms
foreboding, presentiment, intuition, (funny) feeling, hunch, suspicion, feeling in one's bones;
misgiving, apprehension, fear
archaic presage

Origin

mid 16th century (in the sense 'warning'): from French prémonition, from late Latin praemonitio(n-), from Latin praemonere, from prae 'before' + monere 'warn'.

Derivatives

premonitory

1
Pronunciation: /prēˈmänəˌtôrē/
adjective
Example sentences
  • For instance, I'm not looking ahead to my 30th birthday with any sort of premonitory dread.
  • At home, one reaction has been a revival of premonitory scenarios of gloom.
  • All the same, there are two passages in the book that I found eerily premonitory of what she would do ten years later.

Definition of premonition in:

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