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preposition

Syllabification: prep·o·si·tion
Pronunciation: /ˌprepəˈziSH(ə)n
 
/

Definition of preposition in English:

noun

Grammar
A word governing, and usually preceding, a noun or pronoun and expressing a relation to another word or element in the clause, as in “the man on the platform,” “she arrived after dinner,” “what did you do it for?”.
Example sentences
  • It's quite different from English, too, in that it puts the verb at the end of the sentence and uses postpositions instead of prepositions.
  • A good comedy movie is also one that is dripping with humour in small doses, so that even a preposition or a pronoun at a given moment seems hilarious.
  • There is plenty of evidence that even educated Americans often believe that there is something wrong with sentences ending in prepositions.

Origin

late Middle English: from Latin praepositio(n-), from the verb praeponere, from prae 'before' + ponere 'to place'.

More
  • compost from (Late Middle English):

    Garden compost and fruit compôte do not seem to have much in common, but they both derive from French compôte ‘stewed fruit’. This comes from Old French composte, from Latin compositum ‘something put together’—source of compose (Late Middle English) and decompose (mid 18th century), composition (Late Middle English), and component (mid 17th century). Compost has been used in the gardening sense since the late 16th century. The Latin word was formed from com- ‘with’ and the irregular verb ponere ‘put, place’. From this we also get impose (Late Middle English) ‘place (up)on’; oppose (Late Middle English) ‘place against’; positive and posture (late 16th century); preposition (Late Middle English) something put in front, and suppose (Middle English) literally something placed from below.

Usage

There is a traditional view, as set forth by the 17th-century poet and dramatist John Dryden, that it is incorrect to put a preposition at the end of a sentence, as in where do you come from? or she’s not a writer I’ve ever come across. The rule was formulated on the basis that, since in Latin a preposition cannot come after the word it governs or is linked with, the same should be true of English. What this rule fails to take into account is that English is not like Latin in this respect, and in many cases (particularly in questions and with phrasal verbs) the attempt to move the preposition produces awkward, unnatural-sounding results. Winston Churchill famously objected to the rule, saying “This is the sort of English up with which I will not put.” In standard English the placing of a preposition at the end of a sentence is widely accepted, provided the use sounds natural and the meaning is clear.

Derivatives

prepositional

1
adjective
Example sentences
  • Turn up is one of the fossilized prepositional verbs of English, like come across meaning ‘encounter’.
  • After a fair amount of searching, I was not able to find any other examples with participles, and only one example of any kind at all (aside from the possible prepositional examples above).
  • The main reason not to welcome all prepositional uses of than, in my opinion, has to do with sentences like this one: ‘I like her better than him.’

prepositionally

2
Pronunciation: /-SHənl-ē/
adverb
Example sentences
  • But only that which can be true or false - thus prepositionally contentful - can confirm or refute.

Definition of preposition in:

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