Definition of prolific in English:

prolific

Syllabification: pro·lif·ic
Pronunciation: /prəˈlifik
 
/

adjective

  • 1(Of a plant, animal, or person) producing much fruit or foliage or many offspring: in captivity, tigers are prolific breeders
    More example sentences
    • Both are frequently images of creativity: rabbits are prolific and snakes shed their skins and grow new ones as an act of renewal.
    • It is one of Britain's most prolific weeds, with its creeping, fanned leaves having taken over large swathes of countryside.
    • Backs of vacant houses create a poor impression at the Docks, where weeds were quite prolific on the gravel areas.
    Synonyms
    productive, creative, inventive, fertile
  • 1.1(Of an artist, author, or composer) producing many works: he was a prolific composer of operas
    More example sentences
    • A prolific poet and author, he appears for the time being to have put down his pen.
    • She is also a prolific composer of ballads in English and Irish.
    • Beamish is one of the best-known names in classical music, and Britain's most prolific composer of concertos.
  • 1.2(Of a sports player) high-scoring: a prolific home-run hitter
    More example sentences
    • In fact, the line-backer has been a more prolific scorer this season than many offensive players throughout the league.
    • Missing some of their regular players including their prolific scorer, Thomas Doyle, they still managed to gain a point from this fixture.
    • They aren't the most prolific scorers in the league but their goals come from all over the team and with a solid back four they are third in the league on merit.
  • 2Present in large numbers or quantities; plentiful: mahogany was once prolific in the tropical forests
    More example sentences
    • Forty-six species of wildlife have been identified here and the bird life is prolific.
    • Restricted movement causes increased pollution and traffic lights are becoming so prolific there must be a drain on power supplies.
    • What has changed is that this technology has become prolific.
    Synonyms
    plentiful, abundant, bountiful, profuse, copious, luxuriant, rich, lush; fruitful, fecund
    literary plenteous, bounteous
  • 2.1(Of a river, area, or season of the year) characterized by plentiful wildlife or produce: the prolific rivers and lakes of Franklin County
    More example sentences
    • The Dee in Aberdeenshire, once a highly prolific spring river, continues to suffer from a dreadful lack of these big early salmon.
    • From Cape Wrath to Campbeltown, once prolific river systems have been denuded of their most precious asset.
    • Beats higher up the river are often more prolific this late in the season with fish running hard to the middle and upper stretches.

Derivatives

prolificacy

Pronunciation: /-ikəsē/
noun
More example sentences
  • Despite their solidly middle-class roots, the Boultings offered an example of how enthusiastic hopefuls could carve a name for themselves in film from the bottom up through sheer determination and prolificacy.
  • Syrie Johnson goes behind the scenes at the Oscars and finds a prolificacy of pampering, plucking, pinching and preening - all in the pursuit of celebrity
  • Their side benefited most from the prolificacy of their neighbours, but Jim Duffy's men hovered steadfastly in a holding pattern without achieving lift off.

prolifically

Pronunciation: /-ik(ə)lē/
adverb
More example sentences
  • There is quite a bit of maintenance, as everyone knows we shed hair prolifically and when wearing extensions the real hair cannot escape, as it's attached to the extension.
  • In aromatherapy, many essential oils often used as anti-depressants, such as jasmine, rose, neroli, rosemary and lavender, are extracted from plants that flower most prolifically in spring and summer.
  • As someone who rails prolifically against the irrelevance of political science to actual politics, I would have been glad to talk about whether blogging may help make scholarship more relevant.

prolificness

noun
More example sentences
  • Geeks get their credibility and prolificness out of sharing everything - put it in public and the public organizes it for you.

Origin

mid 17th century: from medieval Latin prolificus, from Latin proles 'offspring' (see proliferous).

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