There are 4 definitions of punch in English:

punch1

Syllabification: punch
Pronunciation: /pən(t)SH
 
/

verb

[with object]
1Strike with the fist: she punched him in the face and ran off
More example sentences
  • The men assaulted the guards, knocking the male to the floor and kicking and punching him while pointing a gun at him.
  • She climbed in the kitchen window and saw him with a knife, the court heard, and believing she was at risk kicked and punched him to the floor.
  • Another man, in a Mercedes coupe, was punched and kicked as he grappled with carjackers who struck at Dudley Hill in the city.
Synonyms
hit, strike, thump, jab, smash, welt, cuff, clip; batter, buffet, pound, pummel
informal sock, slug, bop, wallop, clobber, bash, whack, thwack, clout, whomp, cold-cock
literary smite
1.1Drive with a blow from the fist: he punched the ball into his own goal
2Press (a button or key on a machine).
More example sentences
  • He swung the machine aside and punched a few buttons on a control panel, hoisting the machine up to the left side of the ceiling.
  • I punched the button again, pressing my finger against the stupid button until the area around my nail was white with pressure.
  • He reached over and punched a unmarked button on the side of the machine that could only be described as a doorframe.
2.1 (punch something in/into) Enter information by pressing a button or key.
More example sentences
  • You only have to punch the information into a drum machine once.
  • As well, many transactions such as banking that used to require fronting up to a real person can now be done by punching numbers into a machine.
  • They'll simultaneously punch random buttons in separate elevators at the Waldorf, and if they emerge on the same floor, it'll be kismet.
3North American Drive (cattle) by prodding them with a stick.

noun

Back to top  
1A blow with the fist.
More example sentences
  • They ram into the wall, exchanging body blows and punches as they scuffle.
  • A woman staying on the same corridor heard loud punches and likened the blows to those sometimes heard in TV programmes.
  • But domestic violence doesn't always manifest itself in punches and blows.
Synonyms
blow, hit, knock, thump, box, jab, clip, uppercut, hook
informal sock, slug, bop, wallop, bash, whack, clout, belt, knuckle sandwich
dated buffet
1.1 informal The strength needed to deliver a blow with the fist: he has the punch to knock out anyone in his division
More example sentences
  • Just when both sides appeared to be settling for a point Nish delivered the killer punch when he popped up at the back post to convert Hamilton's miss-hit shot.
1.2 [in singular] informal The power to impress or startle: photos give their arguments an extra visual punch
More example sentences
  • The full force of his indomitable logic hits you like a power punch!
  • A caffeinated punch adds to its powers of rejuvenation.
  • Their breakthrough song undoubtedly rocks the venue, with the power punch of a stand-out track.
Synonyms
vigor, liveliness, vitality, drive, strength, zest, verve, enthusiasm; impact, bite, kick
informal oomph, zing, pep

Origin

late Middle English (as a verb in the sense 'puncture, prod'): variant of pounce1.

Phrases

beat someone to the punch

informal Anticipate or forestall someone’s actions.
More example sentences
  • Should we really believe that David floated this story without further confirmation because he was concerned that John might beat him to the punch?
  • You get a story and you want to go with it before somebody else beats you to the punch, so sometimes it doesn't get checked as thoroughly.
  • I am about to share this theory with Byatt, but she beats me to the punch, with yet another theory of her own.

punch the (time) clock

(Of an employee) punch in or out.
More example sentences
  • He denied the charges, pointing out that he had spoken to his supervisor and punched the time clock.
  • Generally speaking, workers didn't start punching the clock because they were forced to but because they wanted to.
  • I've punched the clock from 9-5 for twenty-five years for the corporation.
Be employed in a conventional job with regular hours.
More example sentences
  • At least McGillivary and Barnes punched the clock for a couple of years.
  • My work schedule is very elastic; I don't have to go to meetings, I don't have to punch the clock, I don't have to have my butt in a chair between certain hours.
  • But finally, I got away from punching the clock.

punch someone's lights out

Beat someone up; knock someone unconscious.
[Lights in the sense 'lungs' (see lights)]
More example sentences
  • They always had to talk about beating someone up or punching their lights out.
  • I felt like punching his lights out and beating him to a bloody pulp!
  • Vinnie Jones used to get a feeling seconds before punching someone's lights out.

punch one's ticket

Do or achieve something that enables one to progress to the next step: Krueger punched her ticket to the Championships by taking eighth at the NCAA South Regionals

Phrasal verbs

punch in (or out)

North American Register one’s arrival at (or departure from) work, especially by means of a time clock: she couldn’t punch in, because there were no time clocks
More example sentences
  • The greatest feeling I get as an entrepreneur is when I go into the back, into the facility here and to see the employees punching out on their time cards to go home and on payday to know that I've contributed to their livelihood.
  • The absolute worst work condition we ever heard about was a 1960's factory where the owner made all workers punch out on the time clock to use the bathroom.
  • I watched her absently walk over to the clock and punch out.

punch something up

1Use a computer keyboard to call something to the screen: people will be able to punch up Andy Warhol and get text, photographs, and video on the entire Pop Art period
More example sentences
  • Rather, he says, users will ‘just be able to punch them up’ on the site.
  • Every year, however, it never fails: Someone gives us their registration card (complete with Ethernet address) and we punch it up to verify the brand of card.
2 informal Enliven: he needed to punch up his meandering presentation
More example sentences
  • Unless he punches it up, he will be treated more harshly by CBS than he was by the Senate.
  • They even edit the presentations and punch them up with good intros and music to make them even more entertaining.
  • If she can hold it together and punch things up an notch, she has an outside shot at advancing beyond the semifinals.

Derivatives

puncher

noun
More example sentences
  • Graham opens a drawer in the abandoned Apollo Mission Control room and someone's stuff is still in there: rubber stamps, stationary supplies, and paper punchers.
  • It is going to be a very explosive fight between two aggressive punchers.
  • In his two defeats, both by knockout, he lost concentration and showed that, like many big punchers, he can be rendered unconscious too easily.

Definition of punch in:

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Word of the day epyllion
Pronunciation: əˈpilēən
noun
a narrative poem resembling an epic in style...

There are 4 definitions of punch in English:

punch2

Syllabification: punch
Pronunciation: /pən(t)SH
 
/

noun

1A device or machine for making holes in materials such as paper, leather, metal, and plaster.
More example sentences
  • Use those bits of leftover wrapping paper and a hole punch to make confetti (a great job for the kids)!
  • Give each child a handful of hole punches and let them have sprinkle these over the paper.
  • You may put a hole in the top with a paper punch and tie a ribbon through the hole.
2A tool or machine for impressing a design or stamping a die on a material.
More example sentences
  • He began to concentrate on the design and manufacture of punch, stamp and draw tools for the production of metal car panels.
  • Hollerith designed punches specially made for his system, the Hollerith Electric Tabulating System.
  • After it is cut down, sheet stock goes to the turret punch to get holes put in as needed, goes to a brake press to be bent.

verb

[with object] Back to top  
1Pierce a hole in (metal, paper, leather, etc.) with or as though with a punch.
More example sentences
  • Corresponding holes in the front of the parfleche were punched with a tapestry needle.
  • The papers are neatly punched, indexed and occasionally underlined with red pen.
  • Megawati shouted to her supporters while demonstrating how to punch ballot papers for her party's number and logo of a bull with a white nose at a soccer field in the town of Gianyar.
Synonyms
make a hole in, perforate, puncture, pierce, prick, hole, spike, skewer
literary transpierce
1.1Pierce (a hole) with or as though with a punch.
More example sentences
  • In most manufacturing, the flash hole is simply punched through the bottom of the primer pocket.
  • In a small garden, fill plastic rubbish sacks with them, tie the tops, punch a few holes at the bottom, and leave them to rot down in a quiet corner of the garden till next autumn.
  • He punches spy holes in the wooden shutters so when he is indoors he can look out whether he is sitting or standing.

Origin

early 16th century: perhaps an abbreviation of puncheon1, or from the verb punch1.

Definition of punch in:

There are 4 definitions of punch in English:

punch3

Syllabification: punch
Pronunciation: /pən(t)SH
 
/

noun

A drink made with fruit juices, soda, spices, and sometimes liquor, typically served in small cups from a large bowl.
More example sentences
  • Iced tea, fruit punch, water, milk, coffee, and hot tea were complimentary.
  • Pick your choice of tipple from white or red wine, fruit punch or lager as your peruse the menu and enjoy live reggae music from a local band.
  • Fruit punch made from fruit juice is an excellent source of Vitamin C, providing about 35g of vitamin C per serving.

Origin

mid 17th century: apparently from Sanskrit pañca 'five, five kinds of' (because the drink had five ingredients).

Definition of punch in:

There are 4 definitions of punch in English:

punch4

Syllabification: punch
Pronunciation: /pən(t)SH
 
/

noun

(Punch) A grotesque, hook-nosed, humpbacked buffoon, the chief male character of the Punch and Judy show. Punch is the English variant of a stock character derived ultimately from Italian commedia dell’arte. Also called Punchinello.

Origin

mid 17th century (as a dialect term denoting a short, fat person): abbreviation of Punchinello.

Phrases

pleased as Punch

Feeling great delight or pride.
[with allusion to the delight displayed by the character Punch of the Punch and Judy show]
More example sentences
  • If we give our best and St. Mary's of Galway go home with the cup, we'll congratulate them and salute their success, and we'll still be as proud as Punch of our lads.
  • I am really sad that Fergie was not around on Thursday when I walked out with England at Lord's because he would have been as proud as Punch for me.
  • Because if you visit the region where he started out 10 or 15 years ago, you will quickly discover that his one-time colleagues are as proud as Punch to shake his hand.

Definition of punch in: