Definition of quay in English:

quay

Syllabification: quay
Pronunciation: /kē
 
, k(w)ā
 
/

noun

A concrete, stone, or metal platform lying alongside or projecting into water for loading and unloading ships.
More example sentences
  • It is a source of pride to see the Celtic Explorer alongside the quay in her home port of Galway.
  • The men created a world of their own on the docks, levees, plantation landings, city quays, and steamboat decks of the Mississippi River economy.
  • In 1682, the estates of East Frisia gave Brandenburg-Prussia help by allowing their ships to use her quays in Emden - a large harbour on the North Sea.
Synonyms

Origin

late Middle English key, from Old French kay, of Celtic origin. The change of spelling in the late 17th century was influenced by the modern French spelling quai.

Derivatives

quayage

Pronunciation: /ˈkēij, ˈk(w)āij/
noun
More example sentences
  • Southgate probably represents an area of riverfront settlement providing quayage for boats without them having to travel further upriver to Fybridge.
  • I know that in Liverpool in the late nineteenth century around 0.5 per cent of the entire lineal quayage was unusable because it was covered in rubbish: the lad did not know that.
  • They may be viewed as appendages of large ports, geographically detached representatives of the sixth era, that of ‘specialised quayage’.

Definition of quay in:

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