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radix

Syllabification: ra·dix
Pronunciation: /ˈrādiks, ˈrad-
 
/

Definition of radix in English:

noun (plural radices /ˈradəˌsēz, ˈrā-/)

1 Mathematics The base of a system of numeration. See also base1 (sense 8) of the noun).
Example sentences
  • Here r is the base, or radix, and the coefficients d i are the digits of the number.
  • All that is needed to comprehend the puzzle is understanding that counting by grouping is most easily recorded in the positional notations, radix being the largest group size.
  • Everything hinges on the assumption that the incremental cost of increasing the radix is the same as the incremental cost of increasing the number of digits.
2 formal A source or origin of something: Judaism is the radix of Christianity
More example sentences
  • The unturned chart is called the ‘radical figure’, the radix - the root from which all the symbolism emerges.

Origin

early 17th century (sense 2): from Latin, literally 'root'. sense 1 dates from the late 18th century.

Definition of radix in:

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