There are 4 main definitions of rape in English:

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rape1

Syllabification: rape
Pronunciation: /rāp
 
/

noun

1The crime, typically committed by a man, of forcing another person to have sexual intercourse with the offender against their will: he denied two charges of attempted rape he had committed at least two rapes
Synonyms
sexual assault, sexual abuse, sexual interference
1.1 archaic The abduction of a woman, especially for the purpose of having sexual intercourse with her: the Rape of the Sabine Women
2The wanton destruction or spoiling of a place or area: the rape of the Russian countryside
Synonyms
destruction, violation, ravaging, pillaging, plundering, desecration, defilement, sacking, sack

verb

[with object] Back to top  
1(Especially of a man) force (another person) to have sexual intercourse with the offender against their will: the woman was raped at knifepoint
Synonyms
sexually assault, sexually abuse, violate, force oneself on;
literary ravish
archaic defile
2Spoil or destroy (a place): the timber industry is raping the land
Synonyms
ravage, violate, desecrate, defile, plunder, pillage, despoil;
lay waste, ransack, sack

Origin

late Middle English (originally denoting violent seizure of property, later carrying off a woman by force): from Anglo-Norman French rap (noun), raper (verb), from Latin rapere 'seize'.

More
  • This originally referred to the violent seizure of property, and later to the carrying off of a woman by force. It comes via Anglo-Norman French from Latin rapere ‘seize’, also the source of the word rapacious and rapid [both M17th], and of rapt (Late Middle English) and rapture (late 16th century), when you are carried away by your feelings. In Old French repere was changed to ravir, source of ravish (Middle English). The plant name, rape, originally referred to the turnip. It is from Latin rapum, rapa ‘turnip’.

Derivatives

raper

1
noun

Words that rhyme with rape

agape, ape, cape, chape, crape, crêpe, drape, escape, gape, grape, jape, misshape, nape, scrape, shape, tape

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There are 4 main definitions of rape in English:

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rape2

Syllabification: rape
Pronunciation: /rāp
 
/

noun

A plant of the cabbage family with bright yellow, heavily scented flowers, especially a variety ( oilseed rape) grown for its oil-rich seed and as stockfeed. Also called cole, colza.
  • Genus Brassica, family Brassicaceae, in particular B. napus subsp. oleifera
Example sentences
  • They were back in the country, surrounded by fields of bright yellow oilseed rape.
  • Now the main income is generated by a simplified system of wheat, barley, oilseed rape and sugar beet.
  • Problems facing farmers include the extra costs involved in drying wheat, barley and oilseed rape.

Origin

late Middle English (originally denoting the turnip plant): from Latin rapum, rapa 'turnip'.

More
  • This originally referred to the violent seizure of property, and later to the carrying off of a woman by force. It comes via Anglo-Norman French from Latin rapere ‘seize’, also the source of the word rapacious and rapid [both M17th], and of rapt (Late Middle English) and rapture (late 16th century), when you are carried away by your feelings. In Old French repere was changed to ravir, source of ravish (Middle English). The plant name, rape, originally referred to the turnip. It is from Latin rapum, rapa ‘turnip’.

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There are 4 main definitions of rape in English:

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rape3

Syllabification: rape
Pronunciation: /rāp
 
/

noun

(often rapes)
The stalks and skins of grapes left after winemaking, used in making vinegar.

Origin

early 17th century (as rape wine): from French râpe, medieval Latin raspa 'bunch of grapes'.

More
  • This originally referred to the violent seizure of property, and later to the carrying off of a woman by force. It comes via Anglo-Norman French from Latin rapere ‘seize’, also the source of the word rapacious and rapid [both M17th], and of rapt (Late Middle English) and rapture (late 16th century), when you are carried away by your feelings. In Old French repere was changed to ravir, source of ravish (Middle English). The plant name, rape, originally referred to the turnip. It is from Latin rapum, rapa ‘turnip’.

Definition of rape in:

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There are 4 main definitions of rape in English:

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rape4

Syllabification: rape
Pronunciation: /rāp
 
/

noun

historical
(In the UK) any of the six ancient divisions of Sussex.
Example sentences
  • Their equivalents in the Danelaw were wapen-takes, in Kent lathes, in Yorkshire ridings, and in Sussex rapes.
  • These and the rapes of the south were a cluster of lands granted around a central castle, which the holder was expected to build and maintain.
  • First, the county was, uniquely, divided into six rapes - strips centred on Chichester, Arundel, Bramber, Lewes, Pevensey, and Hastings.

Origin

Old English, variant of rope, with reference to the fencing-off of land.

More
  • This originally referred to the violent seizure of property, and later to the carrying off of a woman by force. It comes via Anglo-Norman French from Latin rapere ‘seize’, also the source of the word rapacious and rapid [both M17th], and of rapt (Late Middle English) and rapture (late 16th century), when you are carried away by your feelings. In Old French repere was changed to ravir, source of ravish (Middle English). The plant name, rape, originally referred to the turnip. It is from Latin rapum, rapa ‘turnip’.

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