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recluse

Syllabification: rec·luse
Pronunciation: /ˈrekˌlo͞os
 
, rəˈklo͞os
 
/

Definition of recluse in English:

noun

A person who lives a solitary life and tends to avoid other people.
Example sentences
  • Though not hermits or recluses, they do enjoy their own space to ruminate about what makes the world go round not to mention what makes people tick.
  • The majority had to severely restrict their lives by changing or abandoning work, curtailing all social activities, and becoming virtual recluses.
  • In his time, ascetics and recluses again made an attempt to enter the Guru's flock.
Synonyms
hermit, ascetic, eremite, marabout
historical anchorite, anchoress
loner, solitary, lone wolf, troglodyte;
misanthrope;
Japanese hikikomori
rare solitudinarian, solitarian

adjective

archaic Back to top  
Favoring a solitary life.
Example sentences
  • He was a very secretive sort of individual, a very recluse sort of a person, and didn't have much to do with many of the people of this congregation.
  • In my youth I was living in the capital, so that I was able to study in the Board of Astronomy; subsequently, I was instructed in mathematics by a recluse scholar.

Origin

Middle English: from Old French reclus, past participle of reclure, from Latin recludere 'enclose', from re- 'again' + claudere 'to shut'.

More
  • closet from (Late Middle English):

    Although closet is now the usual word in American English for a cupboard or wardrobe, it originally referred to a small private room, such as one for study or prayer. This idea of privacy led to the sense of hiding a fact or keeping something secret, which goes right back to the beginning of the 17th century. A person who is hiding the fact that they are gay has been described as in the closet, or as a closet homosexual, since the late 1960s. To out someone, meaning to reveal that they are gay, is a shortened way of saying ‘to force them out of the closet’. Closet comes from close (Middle English), which both in the sense ‘near’ and ‘shut’ go back to Latin claudere ‘to shut’, also the source of recluse (Middle English), someone who shuts themselves away.

Derivatives

reclusion

1
Pronunciation: /riˈklo͞oZHən/
noun
Example sentences
  • His reclusion was so absolute that as recently as 2001 he avoided attending a wedding on the long shot that he might bump into a journalist that he scarcely even knew.
  • In more recent years, Brando's brilliance as an actor was overshadowed by his eccentric reclusion, the turmoil in his family life and financial disputes.
  • For the next five years, Ting plans to live in reclusion and focus on a new breakthrough in his art.

Definition of recluse in:

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