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rhetoric

Syllabification: rhet·o·ric
Pronunciation: /ˈredərik
 
/

Definition of rhetoric in English:

noun

1The art of effective or persuasive speaking or writing, especially the use of figures of speech and other compositional techniques.
Example sentences
  • Born into a rich provincial family, he studied philosophy as well as rhetoric and law.
  • Much of the earlier writing is political rhetoric; much of the later is album verse.
  • In the late twentieth century rhetoric has been revived as the study of the structuring powers of discourse.
Synonyms
oratory, eloquence, command of language, way with words
1.1Language designed to have a persuasive or impressive effect on its audience, but often regarded as lacking in sincerity or meaningful content: all we have from the opposition is empty rhetoric
More example sentences
  • Don't simply opt for apparently powerful but ultimately empty, meaningless rhetoric.
  • Is it no more than rhetoric, designed to scare the mullahs and force them to drop their nuclear programme?
  • Like the style of their rhetoric, the content of their arguments was stirring; it was arousing.
Synonyms

Origin

Middle English: from Old French rethorique, via Latin from Greek rhētorikē (tekhnē) '(art) of rhetoric', from rhētōr 'rhetor'.

Definition of rhetoric in:

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