There are 4 definitions of rove in English:

rove1

Syllabification: rove
Pronunciation: /rōv
 
/

verb

[no object]
1Travel constantly without a fixed destination; wander: a quarter of a million refugees roved around the country
More example sentences
  • It was certainly on my mind as I roved around Gate 5 of Comiskey Park before the 74th All-Star game on the South Side of Chicago.
  • For many years this was a dangerous frontier land, where pirates roved and merchantmen ventured at their peril.
  • Foul-mouthed mobs roved around the dark Edinburgh streets, looting and vandalising premises owned by Italians.
Synonyms
1.1 [with object] Wander over or through (a place) without a destination: children roving the streets
More example sentences
  • In the mid-1800s, they roved the streets of St. John's, sometimes attacking spectators or fighting with rival bands.
  • From the haggard look, rag tag clothing and matted hair it was not difficult to identify her as the mad woman who roved the streets.
  • Like the vast majority of people living in Mexico, he buys his music from one of the 12,000 street vendors who rove the country.
1.2 (usually as adjective roving) Travel for one’s work, having no fixed base: he trained as a roving reporter
More example sentences
  • What is out there course-wise for would-be roving reporters?
  • You'll probably be just a little sickened to hear it's been pretty much plain sailing for this up-and-coming roving reporter.
  • For years he was literally on his feet as a roving reporter, plunged into regions of conflict or crisis to try to make sense of it all for us.
1.3(Of eyes) look in changing directions in order to see something thoroughly: the policeman’s eyes roved around the bar
More example sentences
  • All eyes rove for something catchy at a handicrafts exhibition - for something utilitarian that will appeal to your aesthetic sense too.
  • His eyes roving around the room, searching for a way out of this mess.
  • He unsheathed his father's sword and held it in both hands, his eyes roving over the blade with the ancient runes and the ornately designed handle.

noun

[in singular] chiefly North American Back to top  
A journey, especially one with no specific destination; an act of wandering: a new exhibit will electrify campuses on its national rove

Origin

late 15th century (originally a term in archery in the sense 'shoot at a casual mark of undetermined range'): perhaps from dialect rave 'to stray', probably of Scandinavian origin.

Definition of rove in:

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Word of the day neoteny
Pronunciation: nēˈätn-ē
noun
retention of juvenile features in the adult animal

There are 4 definitions of rove in English:

rove2

Syllabification: rove
Pronunciation: /rōv
 
/
Past of reeve2.

Definition of rove in:

There are 4 definitions of rove in English:

rove3

Syllabification: rove
Pronunciation: /rōv
 
/

noun

A sliver of cotton, wool, or other fiber, drawn out and slightly twisted, especially preparatory to spinning.

verb

[with object] Back to top  
Form (slivers of wool, cotton, or other fiber) into roves.

Origin

late 18th century: of unknown origin.

Definition of rove in:

There are 4 definitions of rove in English:

rove4

Syllabification: rove
Pronunciation: /rōv
 
/

noun

A small metal plate or ring for a rivet to pass through and be clenched over, especially in boatbuilding.
More example sentences
  • Each nail was driven through the two planks, the rove was placed over the end of the nail, and the point was knocked down over the rove to ‘clench’ the two planks together.
  • For door experts, it is made of four plain oak boards, held in place by an edging frame and four half-round ledges, all fastened by neat clasping elongated roves.
  • The posts and the keel would then be joined with iron roves to start the hull, with the three main sections being wedged securely upright with wooden props.

Origin

Middle English: from Old Norse , with the addition of parasitic -v-.

Definition of rove in: