Definition of ruminate in English:

ruminate

Syllabification: ru·mi·nate
Pronunciation: /ˈro͞oməˌnāt
 
/

verb

[no object]
  • 1Think deeply about something: we sat ruminating on the nature of existence
    More example sentences
    • His protagonists are too full of life and way too complicated to be the mere vehicles for ruminating on the contemporary dilemmas they face.
    • As I enjoy the good fortune of greeting my 42nd new year's day, I've been ruminating on one sign of my good fortune: the safe, stable, well protected civil society we enjoy.
    • Montrealers are ruminating on the uncharacteristic torpor that has struck since Christmas.
  • 2(Of a ruminant) chew the cud.
    More example sentences
    • As the cattle paddle, ruminant and ruminating, sociably fussing with flank to flank, they occasionally raise prying muzzles to the horizon where, spectral in the mist and distance out at sea, boats swing to the wind.
    • The cow needs a balance of physical ingredients in her rumen to get her to ruminate, to slow down the flow of food through the stomach and develop rumen wall muscle tone.
    • We are into our third round of chicha, a black cow is ruminating at the barn door.

Derivatives

rumination

Pronunciation: /ˌro͞oməˈnāSHən/
noun
More example sentences
  • For kids, content is malleable, subject to debate, rumination and fascination.
  • Clinically, these might be considered ruminations or perhaps obsessive thoughts.
  • His visual and aural ruminations on racial identity have been featured in galleries and community spaces around the country.

ruminative

Pronunciation: /-ˌnātiv/
adjective
More example sentences
  • Hollander's contribution was the slow movement of the Brahms D Minor Piano Concerto, in a ruminative and thoughtful performance.
  • There's a solemn, ruminative atmosphere, and it's strange to see so many people and hear so little noise.
  • In particular, the ruminative musings on anthropocentricity are virtually absent.

ruminatively

Pronunciation: /-ˌnātivlē/
adverb
More example sentences
  • Hockney just bought this mirror and it has given him a new impetus to do self-portraits. ‘I usually only draw myself in down periods,’ he says, slowly, ruminatively.
  • It's not surprising, I guess, that, by writing about it, I strip memory of its power to make me miserable, controlling the extent to which my imagination works ruminatively and speculatively.
  • Walking along a back country road, a man comes across a farmer standing by a bar-gate, ruminatively watching the sunset.

ruminator

Pronunciation: /-ˌnātər/
noun
More example sentences
  • The shattering implications of Bellesiles' argument for scholars, policy-makers, and ruminators upon the national character are clearly evident, but he leaves them unstated.
  • Of all the writers making a lucrative living off the soul, Thomas Moore has generally been considered the most intelligent and reality-based ruminator on what ails the modern spirit.
  • And even if ruminators can come up with a solution to their problems, because rumination makes their problems seem so large it saps their motivation to take even the littlest steps towards solutions.

Origin

mid 16th century: from Latin ruminat- 'chewed over', from the verb ruminari.

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Pronunciation: ˌkələrəˈto͝orə
noun
elaborate ornamentation of a vocal melody