There are 2 main definitions of salve in English:

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salve 1

Syllabification: salve

noun

1An ointment used to promote healing of the skin or as protection.
Example sentences
  • Rags were boiled for bandages and an assortment of ointments and salves were applied on Erik's skin to promote healing.
  • Calendula helps to heal broken skin, and the oil in the salve creates a protective barrier that prevents mucous membranes from drying out.
  • Other cuts and bruises were likewise administered a healing salve and from his skin I managed to scrub much of the soil and blood.
Synonyms
1.1Something that is soothing or consoling for wounded feelings or an uneasy conscience: the idea provided him with a salve for his guilt
More example sentences
  • In this context, the company's famous ‘do no evil’ motto begins to appear like a salve for a guilty conscience.
  • Sanctions are a salve for our conscience, not a serious attempt to stop the murders.
  • If a writer of epic fantasy isn't willing to trust her imagination and her story - is afraid to let it matter - can a salve for the troubles that afflict us still be found in books?

verb

[with object] Back to top  
1Soothe (wounded pride or one’s conscience): charity salves our conscience
More example sentences
  • Singing and dancing may bring pleasure to the public, charity concerts may salve guilty consciences and the world is definitely in need of some cheering up.
  • After three days of recuperation in the ICU, I was released from the hospital, walking feebly and trying to salve my ego.
  • They have not even the solace of big muscles and the solidarity of unions from which to construct their identities and with which to salve their bruised egos.
Synonyms
2 archaic Apply salve to.
Example sentences
  • Then he carefully cleaned and salved the cuts and scrapes on my face and palms, kissing them lightly and whispering meaningless, soothing sounds to me all the while.
  • In the spirit of pioneers, we're concocting our own remedies and salving our own wounds.
  • They make plastics and polyester: the clothes we wear, the carpets we walk on, frames for our computers, seats to sit on, bottles to drink from and band-aids to salve our wounds.

Origin

Old English sealfe (noun), sealfian (verb), of Germanic origin; related to Dutch zalf and German Salbe.

More
  • quack from mid 16th century:

    ‘If it looks like a duck, walks like a duck, and quacks like a duck, then it just may be a duck.’ was the comment made by the US union leader Walter Reuther about the alleged communists investigated by Senator Joseph McCarthy in the early 1950s. The quack of a duck, recorded from the mid 16th century, is just an imitation of the bird's characteristic sound. The kind of quack who dishonestly claims to have medical skills was originally a quacksalver, a 17th-century word from Dutch quacken ‘to talk foolishly’ and salf the same word as ‘salve’ (Old English) from a Germanic base meaning ‘clarified butter’.

Words that rhyme with salve

multivalve, valve

Definition of salve in:

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There are 2 main definitions of salve in English:

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salve 2 Syllabification: salve

verb

Archaic term for salvage.
Example sentences
  • More recently, 60 brass shell cases were salved from under a 5.5in gun which had been mounted on the stern.

Derivatives

salvable

1
Pronunciation: /ˈsalvəb(ə)l/
adjective
Example sentences
  • These groups, I thought, were the dead and dying; the salvable; and the walking or less seriously wounded.
  • Bolts, screws, pins and nails shall be removed in such a manner as to avoid splitting and breaking of the timbers. Salvable material shall be cleaned, sorted and stored as to size and length for purposes of checking and preparing lists.
  • All wrecks which are obviously not salvable should be blown up or otherwise destroyed.

Origin

Early 18th century: back-formation from the noun salvage.

More
  • quack from mid 16th century:

    ‘If it looks like a duck, walks like a duck, and quacks like a duck, then it just may be a duck.’ was the comment made by the US union leader Walter Reuther about the alleged communists investigated by Senator Joseph McCarthy in the early 1950s. The quack of a duck, recorded from the mid 16th century, is just an imitation of the bird's characteristic sound. The kind of quack who dishonestly claims to have medical skills was originally a quacksalver, a 17th-century word from Dutch quacken ‘to talk foolishly’ and salf the same word as ‘salve’ (Old English) from a Germanic base meaning ‘clarified butter’.

Definition of salve in:

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