There are 4 definitions of sap in English:

sap1

Syllabification: sap

noun

1The fluid, chiefly water with dissolved sugars and mineral salts, that circulates in the vascular system of a plant.
More example sentences
  • Create a living smorgasbord that includes plants with berries, foliage, fruit, nectar, nuts, pollen, sap, and seeds, so critters can dine on what they like.
  • When it shoves its tubelike mouthparts into a plant to suck sap from the xylem, the insect may transmit a deadly plant bacterium, Xylella fastidiosa, in its saliva.
  • Travellers, short on water rations, have died drinking the milky sap of its poisonous foliage.
Synonyms
juice, secretion, fluid, liquid
1.1Vigor or energy: the hot, heady days of youth when the sap was rising
More example sentences
  • They were fresh and flourishing, full of sap and vigor, though many of them had been born long before him.
Synonyms

verb (saps, sapping, sapped)

[with object] Back to top  
1Gradually weaken or destroy (a person’s strength or power): our energy is being sapped by bureaucrats and politicians
More example sentences
  • Your official passion for evidence is gradually sapping your brilliant intellect and smothering your instincts.
  • Gradually but surely, that tiresome old anecdote has sapped my strength, undermined my constitution, withered my life.
  • Over the past months, as I had tried unsuccessfully to fight colds and infections, a tumor had been growing inside my chest, sapping my strength and will power.
Synonyms
erode, wear away/down, deplete, reduce, lessen, attenuate, undermine, exhaust, drain, bleed
1.1 (sap someone of) Drain someone of (strength or power): her illness had sapped her of energy and life
More example sentences
  • Still, he's a flawed guy, and the Philistines capitalize on this by sending in top-secret operative Delilah, the seductive hottie charged with sapping Samson of his strength (no, not that way).
  • Walking the short distance to the mall seemed to have sapped him of all his remaining strength.
  • He planned to sap Elisabeth of all her powers, and then to take over the bridge and all worlds.

Origin

Old English sæp, probably of Germanic origin. The verb (dating from the mid 18th century) is often interpreted as a figurative use of the notion “drain the sap from,” but is derived originally from the verb sap2, in the sense 'undermine'.

Derivatives

sapless

adjective
More example sentences
  • The sapless conducting of Oleg Caetani meant that the performance failed to take fire.
  • As you pity all sapless humans, you must pity and have understanding for the sapless priest.
  • Tirukural 78: Life without love in the heart is like a sapless tree in a barren desert.

Definition of sap in:

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Word of the day anomalous
Pronunciation: əˈnämələs
adjective
deviating from what is standard, normal, or expected

There are 4 definitions of sap in English:

sap2

Syllabification: sap

noun

historical
A tunnel or trench to conceal an assailant’s approach to a fortified place.
More example sentences
  • In the British army, a standard cry was ‘follow the sapper’, the term for those who, under engineer officers, dug the saps or shelter trenches used in the attack on fortresses.
  • Immediately after the explosion, the besiegers could assault the fortress or extend their sap trenches into the crater and reinforce them with gabions.
  • Major-General Pratt ordered his men to dig a long sap trench.

verb (saps, sapping, sapped)

[no object] historical Back to top  
1Dig a sap or saps.
More example sentences
  • They complained that they were not allowed to use bombs or to sap and mine the streets held by the insurgents, and they did not want to give quarter to anyone any more.
  • The geophone, an instrument invented by the French during the War to detect sapping operations of the Germans underground, has been developed by U. S. Engineers for rescue work in mines, gauging tunnel borings, etc.
  • The main section of this unit comprised of paratroopers, including those trained in sapping.
1.1 [with object] archaic Make insecure by removing the foundations of: a crazy building, sapped and undermined by the rats
More example sentences
  • Finally it was found that the foundations were decayed, having been sapped by the constant flooding and it was decided to demolish the church and build a new one.
1.2 [with object] (often as noun sapping) Geography Undercut by water or glacial action.
More example sentences
  • The beach systems are formed entirely by groundwater outflow and sapping where the water table intersects the beach face.

Origin

late 16th century (as a verb in the sense 'dig a sap or covered trench'): from French saper, from Italian zappare, from zappa 'spade, spadework', probably from Arabic sarab 'underground passage', or sabora 'probe a wound, explore'.

Definition of sap in:

There are 4 definitions of sap in English:

sap3

Syllabification: sap

noun

informal , chiefly North American
A foolish and gullible person: He fell for it! What a sap!
More example sentences
  • The message I get from this ad is total jerks and saps favor Carl's Jr's.
  • This writer's contempt for the sensitive sap alone on a stool with his nylon-stringed guitar is matched only by his admiration for the one-man band-similar, but so much cooler.
  • You haven't dragged some poor sap along all this way, have you?

Origin

early 19th century: abbreviation of dialect sapskull 'person with a head like sapwood', from sap1 (in the sense 'sapwood') + skull.

Definition of sap in:

There are 4 definitions of sap in English:

sap4

Syllabification: sap
North American informal

noun

A bludgeon or club.
More example sentences
  • Too many of them jumped me, pinning me with claws and weight so they could use their saps and truncheons until I was in no condition to struggle.
  • I hit him with a sap.

verb (saps, sapping, sapped)

[with object] Back to top  
Hit with a bludgeon or club.
More example sentences
  • She sapped him again, this time in his solar plexus, and he fell, unconscious.

Origin

late 19th century (as a noun): abbreviation of sapling (from which such a club was originally made).

Definition of sap in: