Definition of sausage in English:

sausage

Syllabification: sau·sage
Pronunciation: /ˈsôsij
 
/

noun

1A cylindrical length of minced and seasoned pork, beef, or other meat encased in a skin, typically sold raw to be grilled, boiled, or fried before eating.
More example sentences
  • Though our story is about poultry, it could just as easily be about the pork chop, sausages, or salami sticks in your shopping basket.
  • In medieval Europe pork was certainly the meat most used in sausages, and pepper was the most common spice.
  • This simple pasta dish combines pork sausages with fresh fennel bulbs in a soft, subtly anise-flavoured sauce for spaghetti.
1.1Minced and seasoned meat that has been encased in a skin and cooked or preserved, sold mainly to be eaten cold in slices: smoked German sausage
More example sentences
  • The buffet is packed with stuff like sirloin, pork, shrimp, calamari, chicken, andouille and smoked sausage, as well as hamburger and hot dogs.
  • Pigs are usually slaughtered before Christmas, smoked, made into sausage, and preserved for use throughout the year.
  • Try salty, spicy or smoked meats, such as ham, sausage, cold cuts or wieners.
1.2 [usually as modifier] Used in references to the characteristic cylindrical shape of sausages: mold into a sausage shape
More example sentences
  • He saw the soldiers and the land-girls, the silver sausage shapes of the barrage balloons in the sky, the occasional flight of marauder or defender aeroplanes droning aloft.
  • Form into sausage shapes and use to fill the courgettes.
  • Wet your hands well with cold water, and form the mixture into small, flattened sausage shapes about 8cm long.

Origin

late Middle English: from Old Northern French saussiche, from medieval Latin salsicia, from Latin salsus 'salted' (see sauce).

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