There are 2 definitions of scarify in English:

scarify1

Syllabification: scar·i·fy
Pronunciation: /ˈskarəˌfī
 
/

verb (scarifies, scarifying, scarified)

[with object]
1Cut and remove debris from (a lawn) with a scarifier.
More example sentences
  • Viable seeds were extracted from the pods, scarified with a file, and germinated in the Botany Department greenhouse facilities at the University of Georgia.
  • The rice for Uncle Ben's, Pillsbury, Stouffer's, and General Mills is processed and scarified so that it will cook at the same rate as white rice.
  • Other scenes open out into Mantegna's typical landscapes - rocky mountains scarified by striations and pockmarked with classical ruins.
1.1Break up the surface of (soil or pavement).
More example sentences
  • It is expected that it should be able to rip ice to the same depth it scarifies soil.
  • They intend to scarify the top layer to a depth of a few inches prior to next season.
  • Reverse is better for controlled cutting, pulverizing clods, sorting debris from soil, and scarifying hard ground.
2Make shallow incisions in (the skin), especially as a medical procedure or traditional cosmetic practice: she scarified the snakebite with a paring knife
More example sentences
  • In the past, mild acids, or salt were used to scarify the skin but the scar could be as undesirable as the tattoo.
  • Thus, in Papua New Guinea the Kendengei people of the Sepik ritually scarify adolescent men.
  • This surface effect gives his drawings yet another bodily reference, perhaps unintended, in its resemblance to scarified skin.
3Criticize severely and hurtfully.
More example sentences
  • I was blackballed and blacklisted, vilified and scarified and was reduced to having to go incognito to Cleary's of Ballycroy to enjoy a pint or three.
  • From information released he seemingly has scarified both his Irish and Manchester colleagues.
  • A staunch Wicklow supporter, he has been scarified for hoisting the Dublin colours in Balto.

Origin

late Middle English: from Old French scarifier, via late Latin from Greek skariphasthai 'scratch an outline', from skariphos 'stylus'.

Derivatives

scarification

Pronunciation: /-fiˈkāSHən/
noun
More example sentences
  • Dotted designs represent facial scarifications and remind the viewer of the fleeting nature of youth.
  • In spring, you may also want to give it a scarification to get the thatch (dead matter) out of the roots.
  • Decoration on either side of the abdomen may consist of spirals or animal motifs, and in this area of Nigeria, a prominent navel with surrounding scarification is a sign of beauty.

Definition of scarify in:

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Word of the day vituperate
Pronunciation: vəˈt(y)o͞opəˌrāt
verb
blame or insult (someone) in strong language...

There are 2 definitions of scarify in English:

scarify2

Syllabification: scar·i·fy
Pronunciation: /ˈskerəˌfī
 
/

verb (scarifies, scarifying, scarified)

[with object] (usually as adjective scarifying) informal
Frighten: a scarifying mix of extreme violence and absurdist humor
More example sentences
  • The English novelist responsible for the most scarifying account of literary humiliation ever put into print died a hundred years ago this month.

Origin

late 18th century: formed irregularly from scare, perhaps on the pattern of terrify.

Definition of scarify in: