There are 3 definitions of scotch in English:

scotch1

Syllabification: scotch
Pronunciation: /skäCH
 
/

verb

1 [with object] Decisively put an end to: a spokesman has scotched the rumors
More example sentences
  • At Monday's Civic Centre Committee meeting, the Councillor said rumours needed to be scotched.
  • The records showed his plan had been scotched by a hail of objections from all four of our adjoining neighbours - plus, it seemed, one other mystery objector.
  • The US quickly stepped in to scotch any such plan.
Synonyms
put an end to, put a stop to, nip in the bud, put the lid on; ruin, wreck, destroy, smash, shatter, demolish, frustrate, thwart
informal put paid to, put the kibosh on, scupper, scuttle
1.1 archaic Render (something regarded as dangerous) temporarily harmless: feudal power in France was scotched, though far from killed
More example sentences
  • Shortly afterwards, I saw the same man on television pronouncing that the leader's brilliant speech would scotch the conspirators.
2 [with object] Wedge (someone or something) somewhere: he soon scotched himself against a wall
2.1 archaic Prevent (a wheel or other rolling object) from moving or slipping by placing a wedge underneath.

noun

archaic Back to top  
A wedge placed under a wheel or other rolling object to prevent its moving or slipping.

Origin

early 17th century (as a noun): of unknown origin; perhaps related to skate1. The sense 'render temporarily harmless' is based on an emendation of Shakespeare's Macbeth iii. ii. 13 as “We have scotch'd the snake, not kill'd it,” originally understood as a use of scotch2; the sense 'put an end to' (early 19th century) results from the influence on this of the notion of wedging or blocking something so as to render it inoperative.

Definition of scotch in:

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Word of the day impudicity
Pronunciation: ˌimpyəˈdisitē
noun
lack of modesty

There are 3 definitions of scotch in English:

scotch2

Syllabification: scotch
Pronunciation: /skäCH
 
/
archaic

verb

[with object]
Cut or score the skin or surface of.

noun

Back to top  
A cut or score in skin or another surface.

Origin

late Middle English: of unknown origin.

Definition of scotch in:

There are 3 definitions of scotch in English:

Scotch3

Syllabification: Scotch
Pronunciation: /skäCH
 
/

adjective

old-fashioned term for Scottish.
More example sentences
  • Five round tables covered with Scotch plaid cloths occupy most of the space.
  • We don't specify Scotch beef on our menus because that is what our clients expect when they eat with us and that is what they get.
  • Shoppers are being duped into buying foreign meat which has been inaccurately labelled as Scotch beef, farmers' leaders have claimed.

noun

Back to top  
1 short for Scotch whisky.
More example sentences
  • He demanded a great deal of money, complete privacy, a limo to transport him to and from the meeting and a bottle of the best single malt Scotch at each session.
  • In the same way that a previous generation explored and experimented with single malt Scotch, today's consumers are learning about tequilas and mezcals.
  • He fumbled with the lock on the door to his apartment, looking forward to a stiff shot of single-malt Scotch before fixing dinner.
2 (as plural noun the Scotch) dated The people of Scotland.
More example sentences
  • He died in the Orkney Islands while returning from an expedition against the Scotch.
3 dated The form of English spoken in Scotland.

Origin

late 16th century: contraction of Scottish.

Usage

The use of Scotch to mean ‘of or relating to Scotland or its people’ is disliked by many Scottish people and is now uncommon in modern English. It survives in a number of fixed expressions, such as Scotch broth and Scotch whisky. For more details, see Scottish (usage).

Derivatives

Scotchman

noun
( dated ) (plural Scotchmen)
More example sentences
  • The day was necessary here, he noted, to nourish ‘that noble pride which every Scotchman feels in his ancestral glory and living fame.’
  • He was an old drunken Scotchman, a man of education obviously, and a man of some property, since he lived in idleness.

Scotchwoman

noun
( dated ) (plural Scotchwomen)
More example sentences
  • She was given to the care of a faithful Scotchwoman who had once been our servant.

Definition of scotch in: