There are 2 main definitions of shed in English:

Share this entry

Share this page

shed1

Syllabification: shed
Pronunciation: /SHed
 
/

noun

1A simple roofed structure, typically made of wood or metal, used as a storage space, a shelter for animals, or a workshop.
Example sentences
  • With judgment like that, would you trust any of these gentry to put a roof on your garden shed?
  • Other features include two garden sheds with slated roofs, a tiled pergola, and low voltage ground lighting.
  • It sits in piles by the side of the road, stacked in sods for drying before it is carted off in sacks to hearthsides and fuel sheds all over the region.
Synonyms
hut, lean-to, outhouse, outbuilding;
shack;
potting shed, woodshed, tool shed, garden shed
1.1A larger structure, typically with one or more sides open, for storing or maintaining vehicles or other machinery: a shed is required for the three shunt engines
More example sentences
  • The investigating officer said it appeared the fire had started from within one of the vehicles stored in the shed and then quickly spread.
  • The court heard he went on a fire-starting spree over a five-year period after unsuccessfully applying to join the fire service, targeting houses, sheds and vehicles.
  • The house, which comes complete with an attached garage, is set back from the road in mature gardens with shaped lawns, a paved sun patio, a pond, a lockable store, a shed and a greenhouse.

verb (sheds, shedding, shedded)

[with object] (usually be shedded) Back to top  
Park (a vehicle) in a depot.

Origin

late 15th century: apparently a variant of the noun shade.

More
  • water from (Old English):

    The people living around the Black Sea more than 5 000 years ago had a word for water. We do not know exactly what it was, but it was probably the source for the words used for ‘water’ in many European languages, past and present. In Old English it was wæter. The Greek was hudōr, the source of words like hydraulic (mid 17th century) and hydrotherapy (late 19th century). The same root led to the formation of Latin unda ‘wave’, as in inundate (late 18th century), abound (Middle English) (from Latin abundare ‘overflow’), and undulate (mid 17th century), Russian voda (the source of vodka), German Wasser, and the English words wet (Old English) and otter (Old English). Of the first water means ‘unsurpassed’. The three highest grades into which diamonds or pearls could be classified used to be called waters, but only first water, the top one, is found today, describing a completely flawless gem. An equivalent term is found in many European languages, and all are thought to come from the Arabic word for water, , which also meant ‘shine or splendour’, presumably from the appearance of very pure water. People and things other than gems began to be described as of the first water in the 1820s. Nowadays the phrase is rarely used as a compliment: in a letter written in 1950, P.G. Wodehouse commented disparagingly on J. M. Barrie's play The Admirable Crichton: ‘I remember being entranced with it in 1904 or whenever it was, but now it seems like a turkey of the first water.’ If you study a duck shaking its wings after diving for food you will see the point of water off a duck's back, used since the 1820s of a potentially hurtful remark that has no apparent effect. The water forms into beads and simply slides off the bird's waterproof feathers, leaving the duck dry. Water under the bridge refers to events that are in the past and should no longer to be regarded as important. Similar phrases are recorded since the beginning of the 20th century. A North American variant is water over the dam. The first uses of waterlogged, in the late 18th century, referred to ships that were so flooded with water that they became heavy and unmanageable, and no better than a log floating in the sea. A watershed, a ridge of land that separates waters flowing to different rivers or seas, has nothing to do with garden sheds but means ‘ridge of high ground’ and is connected with shed (Old English) meaning ‘discard’.

Share this entry

Share this page

 

Get more from Oxford Dictionaries

Subscribe to remove ads and access premium resources

There are 2 main definitions of shed in English:

Share this entry

Share this page

shed2

Syllabification: shed
Pronunciation: /SHed
 
/

verb (sheds, shedding; past and past participle shed)

[with object]
1(Of a tree or other plant) allow (leaves or fruit) to fall to the ground: both varieties shed leaves in winter
More example sentences
  • When a horwath tree shed its leaves, the leaves fell to the ground, and were extremely soft and fluffy.
  • Most of the deciduous trees have shed their leaves by mid-December.
  • The trees had shed their leaves, leaving vast sheets of different colors covering the once bright green grasses.
1.1(Of a reptile, insect, etc.) allow (its skin or shell) to come off, to be replaced by another one that has grown underneath.
Example sentences
  • Both are frequently images of creativity: rabbits are prolific and snakes shed their skins and grow new ones as an act of renewal.
  • Each time the caterpillar grows bigger, it sheds its skin in a process called molting.
  • The male crabs shed their shells twice a year, in autumn and spring.
Synonyms
1.2(Of a mammal) lose (hair) as a result of molting, disease, or age.
Example sentences
  • Dogs also require regular grooming, as all dogs shed hair.
  • Cheap brushes are a huge headache mainly because they shed hair and lose their shape quicker than quality brushes.
  • My dog is shedding more hair than usual.
1.3Take off (clothes).
Example sentences
  • She shed her clothes and pulled on the catsuit.
  • I shed my clothes and pull on black jeans, a black shirt and black shoes and quickly tied my hair back with a black hair tie.
  • I shed the clothes I was wearing, and pulled on the new outfit.
Synonyms
take off, remove, shrug off, discard, doff, climb out of, slip out of, divest oneself of, peel off
1.4Discard (something undesirable, superfluous, or outdated): what they lacked was a willingness to shed the arrogance of the past
More example sentences
  • Marr acknowledges that, in shedding pivotal players and considerable sums from both the playing budget and debt, his club must also shed expectations.
  • When asked whether the Chilean had shed the excess pounds he gained after his injury, he joked that all that worried him was the player's haircut.
  • Governments should not be allowed to shed this responsibility by appealing for private donations.
Synonyms
1.5Have the property of preventing (something) from being absorbed: this leather has a superior ability to shed water, sweat, and salt
More example sentences
  • It keeps your feet dry as it sheds water and defies mud.
  • When it's oriented up, the boards will shed water and will tend to flatten over time.
  • Because they were made of wool, they shed water, though eventually they'd get wet.
1.6Eliminate part of (an electrical power load) by disconnecting circuits.

Origin

Old English sc(e)ādan 'separate out (one selected group), divide', also 'scatter', of Germanic origin; related to Dutch and German scheiden. Compare with sheath.

More
  • water from (Old English):

    The people living around the Black Sea more than 5 000 years ago had a word for water. We do not know exactly what it was, but it was probably the source for the words used for ‘water’ in many European languages, past and present. In Old English it was wæter. The Greek was hudōr, the source of words like hydraulic (mid 17th century) and hydrotherapy (late 19th century). The same root led to the formation of Latin unda ‘wave’, as in inundate (late 18th century), abound (Middle English) (from Latin abundare ‘overflow’), and undulate (mid 17th century), Russian voda (the source of vodka), German Wasser, and the English words wet (Old English) and otter (Old English). Of the first water means ‘unsurpassed’. The three highest grades into which diamonds or pearls could be classified used to be called waters, but only first water, the top one, is found today, describing a completely flawless gem. An equivalent term is found in many European languages, and all are thought to come from the Arabic word for water, , which also meant ‘shine or splendour’, presumably from the appearance of very pure water. People and things other than gems began to be described as of the first water in the 1820s. Nowadays the phrase is rarely used as a compliment: in a letter written in 1950, P.G. Wodehouse commented disparagingly on J. M. Barrie's play The Admirable Crichton: ‘I remember being entranced with it in 1904 or whenever it was, but now it seems like a turkey of the first water.’ If you study a duck shaking its wings after diving for food you will see the point of water off a duck's back, used since the 1820s of a potentially hurtful remark that has no apparent effect. The water forms into beads and simply slides off the bird's waterproof feathers, leaving the duck dry. Water under the bridge refers to events that are in the past and should no longer to be regarded as important. Similar phrases are recorded since the beginning of the 20th century. A North American variant is water over the dam. The first uses of waterlogged, in the late 18th century, referred to ships that were so flooded with water that they became heavy and unmanageable, and no better than a log floating in the sea. A watershed, a ridge of land that separates waters flowing to different rivers or seas, has nothing to do with garden sheds but means ‘ridge of high ground’ and is connected with shed (Old English) meaning ‘discard’.

Phrases

shed (someone's) blood

1
Be injured or killed (or kill or injure someone).
Example sentences
  • I had killed her; I did not deserve to live after shedding her blood.
  • Would you be ready to shed your blood in the name of liberty without knowing whether you are making history or just adding to the list of nameless victims of the tyranny?
  • We know that when you were in the shock youth brigade you made a lot of sacrifices for the homeland, you even shed your blood and broke your bones.

shed light on

2
see light1.

shed tears

3
Weep; cry.
Example sentences
  • You would almost see the palm trees weeping and shedding tears.
  • Anne is not disregarding professional etiquette if she sheds tears with the patient.
  • Those appearing before the commission may weep, for one reason or another, but it is the taxpayers of this country, ultimately, who should be shedding tears over the incessant and ongoing revelations of this kind.
Synonyms

Share this entry

Share this page

 

What do you find interesting about this word or phrase?

Comments that don't adhere to our Community Guidelines may be moderated or removed.