There are 2 definitions of sic in English:

sic1

Syllabification: sic

adverb

Used in brackets after a copied or quoted word that appears odd or erroneous to show that the word is quoted exactly as it stands in the original, as in a story must hold a child’s interest and “enrich his [sic] life.”.

Origin

Latin, literally 'so, thus'.

Definition of sic in:

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Word of the day inamorata
Pronunciation: inˌaməˈrätə
noun
a person's female lover

There are 2 definitions of sic in English:

sic2

Syllabification: sic
(also sick)

verb (sics, siccing, sicced or sics, sicking, sicked)

[with object] (sic something on)
1Set a dog or other animal on (someone): the plan was to surprise the heck out of the grizzly by sicking the dog on him
More example sentences
  • You know, my agent called me up and said, ‘There's a show they're going to sic dogs on people.’
1.1 (sic someone on) informal Set someone to pursue, keep watch on, or accompany (another).
More example sentences
  • How could this be the same politician who a decade later would sic James Watt on the nation's wilderness and prairies?
  • But,’ he added, ‘if you keep calling me all these fruity nicknames, I'm going to sic Luci on you.’
  • Leah was jealous of how good you were for a beginner, and decided to sic Kat on you.

Origin

mid 19th century: dialect variant of seek.

Definition of sic in: