There are 2 definitions of snuff in English:

snuff1

Syllabification: snuff
Pronunciation: /snəf
 
/

verb

[with object]
1Extinguish (a candle): a breeze snuffed out the candle
More example sentences
  • My candle was snuffed out and I knew it would never relight again.
  • All the candles were snuffed out immediately and a strong smell of brimstone and myrrh filled the room.
  • Sure, the candle was snuffed out at one moment, but that could have been the wind.
Synonyms
extinguish, put out, douse, smother, choke, blow out, quench, stub out
1.1 dated Trim the charred wick from (a candle).
1.2 informal Kill or put an end to in an abrupt or sudden manner: his life was snuffed out by a sniper’s bullet
1.3 (snuff it) British informal Die.
More example sentences
  • If she snuffs it, will normal television programmes be suspended and will there be a national Three Minute Silence?
  • They'll buy a house, turn it into their own personal nursing home and when the last of them snuffs it, the nurses get the house.
  • The family is in line for money left by Mother but not before the old boy upstairs snuffs it.

noun

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The charred part of a candle wick.

Origin

late Middle English: of unknown origin.

Definition of snuff in:

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There are 2 definitions of snuff in English:

snuff2

Syllabification: snuff
Pronunciation: /snəf
 
/

noun

Powdered tobacco that is sniffed up the nostril rather than smoked: a pinch of snuff
More example sentences
  • Eating out every other day or habits like chewing betel leaves, tobacco, taking snuff, smoking, and drinking take their toll on one's health and voice.
  • Although bubble gum and candy are also packaged to resemble snuff, chewing tobacco, pipes, and cigars, we do not know if similar evidence exists for such products or in other countries.
  • I would take my brown bag lunch down to Fish Creek behind the football field where I had smoked pot and done snuff back in my middle school.

verb

[with object] Back to top  
1Inhale or sniff at (something): they stood snuffing up the keen cold air
1.1 [no object] archaic Sniff up powdered tobacco.

Origin

late Middle English (as a verb): from Middle Dutch snuffen 'to snuffle'. The noun dates from the late 17th century and is probably an abbreviation of Dutch snuftabak.

Phrases

up to snuff

informal
1Meeting the required standard: they need a million dollars to get their facilities up to snuff
More example sentences
  • Our columnists are required to be up to snuff on everything and muster up opinions on a wide range of topics.
  • More attention to detail - making sure his physique was evenly balanced and that weak points were brought up to snuff - was required.
  • There are the occasional stories that on second/third/fourth look didn't hold up and I've very occasionally bought a story that I didn't think was up to snuff that I was pressured to buy for one reason or another.
1.1In good health: he hadn’t felt up to snuff all summer
2British archaic Not easily deceived; knowing: an up-to-snuff old vagabond

Definition of snuff in: