Definition of sprint in English:

sprint

Syllabification: sprint
Pronunciation: /sprint
 
/

verb

[no object]

noun

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  • 1An act or short spell of running at full speed.
    More example sentences
    • During the last 10 seconds of your 60-second recovery jog, crank up the speed for your next sprint.
    • Tal forgot where he was and ignored the stubborn pain in his leg, running at a full sprint.
    • I've also been joining the Road Runners for weekly runs that vary in length and type, including slow jogs, hills, sprints and speed running.
  • 1.1A short, fast race in which the competitors run a distance of 400 meters or less: the 100 meters sprint
    More example sentences
    • Radanova was world champion in 2000, when she won the 500-metre sprint.
    • I hope to take up athletics and would like to compete in either the 100 metre or 200 metre sprint.
    • He was also a Lancashire athletics sprint champion and a more than adequate club cricketer.
  • 1.2A short, fast race or exercise in cycling, swimming, horse racing, etc..
    More example sentences
    • By winning the final sprint, the Australian champion prevented German Erik Zabel winning a seventh successive green jersey.
    • Lenton also remained undefeated in sprint freestyle, winning her 4th gold medal of the tour.
    • Teams then lined up on the water for two rounds of 400-metre sprint racing.

Derivatives

sprinter

noun
More example sentences
  • He has definitely been one of the most consistent and competitive sprinters ever.
  • Distance runners think most sprinters are show ponies anyway, because they prance about a bit.
  • I'd like to see myself in the team but I've obviously still to go out and prove I can run really well against the top sprinters.

Origin

late 18th century (as a dialect term meaning 'a bound or spring'): related to Swedish spritta.

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