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stork

Syllabification: stork
Pronunciation: /stôrk
 
/

Definition of stork in English:

noun

1A tall long-legged wading bird with a long heavy bill and typically with white and black plumage.
Example sentences
  • Other migratory birds observed in the shallow waters were bar headed geese, open bill storks, northern pintails, gadwalls, curlews, black tailed godwits, spoonbills, green shanks, red shanks and so on.
  • Forest wagtails, fly catchers, black crested buzzard, open billed storks and egrets are some of the migratory birds one can sight at the Guindy National Park during winter.
  • The carcasses of ospreys, white-tailed sea eagles, deer, black and white storks and herons are also being found.
1.1The white stork as the pretended bringer of babies.
Example sentences
  • While he never delivered a baby, as storks supposedly do, he was just as dependable, never missing a game in 15 seasons.
  • You can use plastic ornaments and toys as your cake decoration, such as umbrellas, storks, bassinets, baby bottles, sports figure dells and newborn baby dolls.
  • This is akin to teaching that babies come from storks.

Origin

Old English storc, of Germanic origin; probably related to stark (because of its rigid stance).

More
  • naked from (Old English):

    The Old English word naked comes from the same ultimate root as nude (Late Middle English), Latin nudus. The sense of ‘blatant, clear, unashamed’, as in naked ambition, dates from the 13th century. The naked truth, meaning ‘the plain truth, without concealment or embellishment’, dates back to the 14th century. It may originally have developed as a translation of the Latin phrase nudaque veritas in the Odes of the Roman writer Horace, or have come from fables personifying Truth as a naked woman, in contrast to Falsehood, who is elaborately dressed. Stark naked is an alteration of start naked, which probably meant ‘naked even to the tail’, as a start was an animal's tail—as in the red-rumped bird the redstart (late 16th century). First recorded as early as 1530, stark naked developed into starkers in the 1920s. The change was made the easier because stark, which had meant ‘hard, stiff’ in Old English had come to mean ‘absolutely, utterly’ in late Middle English, as in stark staring mad. Words related to stark include the starch (Old English) used for stiffening clothes and probably the stork (Old English) from the bird's stiff posture.

Words that rhyme with stork

auk, baulk, Bork, caulk (US calk), chalk, cork, dork, Dundalk, Falk, fork, gawk, hawk, Hawke, nork, orc, outwalk, pork, squawk, stalk, talk, torc, torque, walk, york

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