Definition of sucker in English:

sucker

Syllabification: suck·er
Pronunciation: /ˈsəkər
 
/

noun

1A person or thing that sucks, in particular.
More example sentences
  • I would like an explanation on why a meticulous man who removes his glasses would leave cardiogram suckers on his chest.
  • Farmers in both Cameroon and Nigeria are willing to pay for the clean, improved suckers.
  • In 1953 he developed a lightweight, foot-operated sucker.
1.1A flat or concave organ enabling an animal to cling to a surface by suction.
More example sentences
  • Hillstream loaches have flattened bodies and utilize suckers, permanently clinging to rock faces so they are not swept downstream.
  • The tube feet of ophiuroids lack suckers and ampullae.
  • What are the implications of the physical properties of water for suction attachment in octopus suckers?
1.2The piston of a suction pump.
More example sentences
  • This sucker ran on a shaft drive. Turning the pedals turned an eccentric cam just above the bottom bracket, which then turned a shaft drive that lead down to the rear wheel, where another cam converted this to rotational motion.
  • Once the sucker is attached to an object, any force that pulls the sucker away from the surface tends to lift the piston.
1.3A pipe through which liquid is drawn by suction.
More example sentences
  • Uncle Roy had made the cages himself from pipe and sucker rod left over from oil wells.
  • We are one of the most professional suppliers of casing, tubing, line pipe, sucker rod and other oilfield equipment in China.
2 informal A gullible or easily deceived person.
More example sentences
  • The gullible sucker actually plunks down money for an ‘outfit’ of software and seed emails.
  • Yes, someone made it up solely for the purpose of trying to see how many gullible suckers they can con into forwarding it.
  • I do feel sorry for the poor suckers who bought the book in the airport bookstore who think they are getting a book about blogs when they are actually getting a typical piece of right wing rubbish.
2.1 (a sucker for) A person particularly susceptible to or fond of a specified thing: I always was a sucker for a good fairy tale
More example sentences
  • Your editor begins by disclosing a prejudice: he is a sucker for real estate.
  • Then again, I always was a sucker for Churchill.
  • Always a sucker for a bit of cream cheese and smoked salmon I was delighted to discover the basil seasoning added some extra taste sensations to the panini.
3North American informal A thing or person not specified by name: he’s one strong sucker
More example sentences
  • One Scottish scrum disintegrated completely and the Springboks are not noted for giving a sucker an even break.
  • If the woman had let me drive a nail - that's right, I wasn't allowed to drive the nails - it wouldn't have taken two hours to get those suckers on the wall.
  • Right, so after one of these suckers and only one, on account of the moderate alcohol consumption as dictated by the party poopers, some tension is alleviated.
4 Botany A shoot springing from the base of a tree or other plant, especially one arising from the root below ground level at some distance from the main stem or trunk.
More example sentences
  • The vitex, too, can produce water sprouts, or vigorous vertical growths from larger branches and root suckers from the base of the tree.
  • Keep root suckers, growths from the base of the tree, removed at all times.
  • Black raspberries do not produce root suckers as do red raspberries.
4.1A side shoot from an axillary bud, as in tomato plants.
More example sentences
  • It sounds as if your mother plant has produced suckers while the fruit has been developing and ripening.
  • If your original plant is healthy and has produced suckers while the fruit has been developing and ripening, a sucker may produce a second fruit.
  • Many plants, such as strawberries, reproduce both sexually by seeds and also by putting out suckers that produce plants that are simply extensions of the parent plant.
5A freshwater fish with thick lips that are used to suck up food from the bottom, native to North America and Asia.
  • Family Catostomidae: many genera and species
More example sentences
  • You have the fish - your piranha, your suckers, your blowfish, your sharks, your bottom feeders, your overpriced tuna.
  • Some of the common fish species include the freshwater drum, sheepshead, lake sturgeon, spotted suckers, common red-horse, and pumpkinseed.
  • Biologists considered the sucker a common fish only 30 years ago, but it has experienced a sharp decline and now is absent from 75 percent of its historic range.
6North American informal A lollipop.
More example sentences
  • A bag of suckers, chocolate cupcakes, caramels, jawbreakers and licorice all went into the bag first.
  • Her mother went around their hometown of Waterford, Mich., selling chocolate suckers to help fund Jean's first luge camp when she was a teenager.
  • Usually places like this had little sucker candies in bowls on the front desk.

verb

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1 [no object] Botany (Of a plant) produce suckers: it spread rapidly after being left undisturbed to sucker
More example sentences
  • Celastrus orbiculatus can spread vegetatively by root suckering, and A. altissima spreads rhizomatously, forming extensive clones.
  • Jones and Raynal found no relationship between root suckering and beech bark disease infection as long as the parent tree was still alive, therefore, it is not likely that the disease is the cause of the clonality observed at this site.
  • Aspens aren't the only trees that propagate through root suckering.
2 [with object] North American informal Fool or trick (someone): they got suckered into accepting responsibility
More example sentences
  • ‘We were all suckered into it,’ Mr. Gephardt said.
  • With 400 people spilling off the sidewalk, I was suckered into working the door for a quick 50 bucks and all the cases of beer I could confiscate.
  • True to his word, Matt accepted some invitation for us to attend some awards show and somehow I was suckered into presenting an award.

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