Definition of surcease in English:

surcease

Syllabification: sur·cease
Pronunciation: /sərˈsēs
 
/

noun

archaic or North American
1Cessation: he teased us without surcease
More example sentences
  • In Savannah Bay, two women talk and talk - or pause and pose - without surcease.
  • In this country, not only have we been about the making of many, many books in recent years-more than 175,000 new titles and editions last year alone-but there also appears to be no surcease in sight.
1.1Relief or consolation: drugs are taken to provide surcease from intolerable psychic pain
More example sentences
  • My wife Mary returned to Honolulu with Miki to help with all the arrangements and to offer some surcease from the grief.
  • All the 12-steps deals seem to give him some sort of surcease from daily pressures.
  • A mixture of pain, grief, and guilt - one of the most bitter cocktails the human experience offers - can cause people to do unexpected things in the quest for surcease.

verb

[no object] archaic Back to top  
Cease.
More example sentences
  • You can now toss the bottle of Prozac over your shoulder and realize that depression has surceased.
  • Logging old growth forests - and distributing and selling old growth forest products - is a barbaric, outdated practice that has surceased in the American marketplace.

Origin

late Middle English (as a verb): from Old French sursis, past participle of Old French surseoir 'refrain, delay', from Latin supersedere (see supersede). The change in the ending was due to association with cease; the noun dates from the late 16th century.

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