Definition of sycophant in English:

sycophant

Syllabification: syc·o·phant
Pronunciation: /ˈsikəˌfant, ˈsikəfənt
 
/

noun

A person who acts obsequiously toward someone important in order to gain advantage.
More example sentences
  • An assortment of hatchet men, opportunists and sycophants gained access to the levers of power.
  • There will be several servile sycophants who will come forward as ‘White Knights’ to regain their lost positions.
  • Only the most sycophantic of the sycophants would even begin to make such a comparison. [In the past] there was at least a real enemy, there were real things to be done.
Synonyms
yes-man, bootlicker, brown-noser, toady, lickspittle, flatterer, flunky, lackey, spaniel, doormat, stooge, cringer, suck, suck-up

Origin

mid 16th century (denoting an informer): from French sycophante, or via Latin from Greek sukophantēs 'informer', from sukon 'fig' + phainein 'to show'; the association with informing against the illegal exportation of figs from ancient Athens (recorded by Plutarch) is not substantiated.

Derivatives

sycophancy

Pronunciation: /-fənsē, -ˌfansē/
noun
More example sentences
  • Yet, in the boardroom, the deputies' opinions count for next-to-nothing: their deference and sycophancy are palpable.
  • Sick of the sycophancy and self-absorption all around her, why she flings herself into an affair with a comedian, desperate for media attention, is never made clear.
  • The desire to suck-up to ‘prestigious individuals’ is a survival mechanism; ‘prestigious individuals’ have leadership potential and the power to reward our sycophancy.

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Pronunciation: ˈflipənt
adjective
not showing a serious or respectful attitude