Definition of syndicalism in English:

syndicalism

Syllabification: syn·di·cal·ism
Pronunciation: /ˈsindəkəˌlizəm
 
/

noun

historical
A movement for transferring the ownership and control of the means of production and distribution to workers' unions. Influenced by Proudhon and by the French social philosopher Georges Sorel (1847–1922), syndicalism developed in French labor unions during the late 19th century and was at its most vigorous between 1900 and 1914, particularly in France, Italy, Spain, and the US.
More example sentences
  • Others inside the party nurtured hopes of a return to past Stalinist glories or some form of militant syndicalism.
  • Once again, this stance expresses political passivity, this time dressed up in the garb of militant syndicalism.
  • His arrest and eventual acquittal on charges of sedition strengthened militant convictions that he took back to Britain in 1910 and pursued through syndicalism and then communism.

Origin

early 20th century: from French syndicalisme, from syndical, from syndic 'a delegate' (see syndic).

Derivatives

syndicalist

noun & adjective
More example sentences
  • Deeply antagonistic to reformist compromises with bourgeois democracy, syndicalists also disputed the Leninist strategy of organizing revolution via a vanguard party.
  • The small but real contribution of the Trotskyists, the syndicalists and others to the left of the Communist Party is ignored.
  • Many anarchists and syndicalists supported the revolution and he was keen to win them over.

Definition of syndicalism in:

Get more from Oxford Dictionaries

Subscribe to remove ads and access premium resources

Word of the day vituperate
Pronunciation: vəˈt(y)o͞opəˌrāt
verb
blame or insult (someone) in strong language...