Definition of syntagmatic in English:

syntagmatic

Syllabification: syn·tag·mat·ic
Pronunciation: /ˌsin(t)aɡˈmadik
 
/

adjective

Of or denoting the relationship between two or more linguistic units used sequentially to make well-formed structures. Contrasted with paradigmatic.
More example sentences
  • In this and the next chapter I turn to ‘horizontal’ relations between units, that is to say, the syntagmatic combination of simpler units into larger, internally more complex units.
  • The semiology of the cinema will be the discipline that applies linguistic model, especially syntagmatic ones, to images as constituting one of their principle ‘codes’.
  • Chinese poetic discourse favors syntagmatic relations between its constituent elements.

Derivatives

syntagmatically

Pronunciation: /-ik(ə)lē/
adverb
More example sentences
  • The operative semantic is copulative, a linking (purely syntagmatically) of isolated units still preserving their molecular independency.
  • For instance, cut and knife are syntagmatically similar since they typically co-occur within the same context.
  • Both stress accent and pitch accent are syntagmatically contrastive, while lexical tone is contrastive in a paradigmatic way.

syntagmatics

noun
[treated as singular]
More example sentences
  • His method of analysis is known as syntagmatics as opposed to Levi Strauss's paradigmatic.
  • Functional syntagmatics is not equivalent to the traditional Arabic grammar, nor to the science of rhetoric.
  • The syntagmatics of this advert represent the product as one of the leading brands in oral health care, using interesting methods to sell this product.

Definition of syntagmatic in:

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