There are 4 main definitions of temple in English:

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temple1

Syllabification: tem·ple
Pronunciation: /ˈtempəl
 
/

noun

1A building devoted to the worship, or regarded as the dwelling place, of a god or gods or other objects of religious reverence.
Example sentences
  • Prayers for the temple and for its worship participants are given priority.
  • Devotees flock to the temples to perform the ritual.
  • Hindus seek to find God on the inside while also worshiping God in the temples.
1.1 (the Temple) Either of two successive religious buildings of the Jews in Jerusalem. The first (957–586 bc) was built by Solomon and destroyed by Nebuchadnezzar; it contained the Ark of the Covenant. The second (515 bc- ad 70) was enlarged by Herod the Great from 20 bc and destroyed by the Romans during a Jewish revolt; all that remains is the Western Wall.
Example sentences
  • The Romans destroyed our Temple.
  • Jerusalem has been conquered and the Temple has been destroyed.
  • Alexander was planning to destroy the Temple.
1.2 (the Temple) A group of buildings in Fleet Street in London that stand on land formerly occupied by the headquarters of the Knights Templar. Located there are the Inner and Outer Temple, two of the Inns of Court.
Example sentences
  • The Temple was the London residence of the Knights Templar until their dissolution.
1.3North American A synagogue.
Example sentences
  • In the USA, synagogues are often called temples.
  • I always taught in the temple where the Jews always meet.
  • We were married by the rabbi of the temple I had attended as a child.
1.4A place of Christian public worship, especially a Protestant church in France.
Example sentences
  • He examines Huguenot temples, the symbol of the Protestant place in France.
  • You can speak to members of your temples and churches.
  • The art was too reminiscent of frescoes in temples or churches!

Origin

Old English templ, tempel, reinforced in Middle English by Old French temple, both from Latin templum 'open or consecrated space'.

More
  • Temple comes from Latin templum ‘open or consecrated space’. The temple which is part of your forehead is a different word, going back to Latin tempus, whose main meaning was ‘time’. Tempus is the source of several words in English, such as contemporary (mid 17th century) ‘of a time with’, grammatical tense (Middle English), and temporary (mid 16th century). Tempo (early 18th century), which came to English from Italian, is now a musical term, but in the 17th century was used in fencing for the timing of an attack. Tempest (Middle English) also goes back to tempus, via Latin tempestas ‘season, weather, storm’.

Words that rhyme with temple

stemple

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There are 4 main definitions of temple in English:

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temple2

Syllabification: tem·ple
Pronunciation: /ˈtempəl
 
/

noun

The flat part of either side of the head between the forehead and the ear.
Example sentences
  • He had been shot in the forehead and the right temple.
  • Next comes the pain that invades your forehead, temples and the nape of your neck.
  • Hints of grey showed about the temples and forehead.

Origin

Middle English: from Old French, from an alteration of Latin tempora, plural of tempus 'temple of the head'.

More
  • Temple comes from Latin templum ‘open or consecrated space’. The temple which is part of your forehead is a different word, going back to Latin tempus, whose main meaning was ‘time’. Tempus is the source of several words in English, such as contemporary (mid 17th century) ‘of a time with’, grammatical tense (Middle English), and temporary (mid 16th century). Tempo (early 18th century), which came to English from Italian, is now a musical term, but in the 17th century was used in fencing for the timing of an attack. Tempest (Middle English) also goes back to tempus, via Latin tempestas ‘season, weather, storm’.

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There are 4 main definitions of temple in English:

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temple3

Syllabification: tem·ple
Pronunciation: /ˈtempəl
 
/

noun

Origin

late Middle English: from Old French, perhaps ultimately the same word as temple2.

More
  • Temple comes from Latin templum ‘open or consecrated space’. The temple which is part of your forehead is a different word, going back to Latin tempus, whose main meaning was ‘time’. Tempus is the source of several words in English, such as contemporary (mid 17th century) ‘of a time with’, grammatical tense (Middle English), and temporary (mid 16th century). Tempo (early 18th century), which came to English from Italian, is now a musical term, but in the 17th century was used in fencing for the timing of an attack. Tempest (Middle English) also goes back to tempus, via Latin tempestas ‘season, weather, storm’.

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There are 4 main definitions of temple in English:

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Temple4

Syllabification: Tem·ple
Pronunciation: /ˈtempəl
 
/
An industrial and commercial city in central Texas; population 59,654 (est. 2008).

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