There are 2 main definitions of thrum in English:

Share this entry

thrum 1

Syllabification: thrum

verb (thrums, thrumming, thrummed)

[no object]
1Make a continuous rhythmic humming sound: the boat’s huge engines thrummed in his ears
More example sentences
  • The only sounds were bugs thrumming in the grasses above and birds chirping even higher up.
  • There is the occasional bit of ambient engine thrumming, or an occasional starship flyby that uses directional effects, but these uses are infrequent and nothing to write home about.
  • Outside the dramatically beautiful Saitama stadium the coaches were waiting to leave, their engines thrumming in the darkness.
1.1 [with object] Strum (the strings of a musical instrument) in a rhythmic way.
Example sentences
  • A case in point is ‘Smelling Limes In Winter’ which begins with thrumming, dulcimer-like pluckings through which a central drone rises.
  • Stretched full upon the floor would lay the minstrel, lute in hands, thrumming gently as his voice rang out through the marble room.
  • The blind man had finished his song; he began thrumming the strings again and singing amusing ballads.

noun

[usually in singular] Back to top  
A continuous rhythmic humming sound: the steady thrum of rain on the windows
More example sentences
  • Conversations aggregate into a low thrum that sounds like oiled loafers swooshing over carpet.
  • A loud whoop was briefly transmitted from the ship before the only sound was the thrum of the thrusters as the captain throttled them back down.
  • The sounds of their talking was a steady thrum in my ears, growing louder and louder as Four's hand on my arm grew tighter and tighter.

Origin

Late 16th century (as a verb): imitative.

Words that rhyme with thrum

become, benumb, Brum, bum, chum, crumb, drum, glum, gum, ho-hum, hum, Kara Kum, lum, mum, numb, plum, plumb, Rhum, rhumb, rum, scrum, scum, slum, some, strum, stum, succumb, sum, swum, thumb, tum, yum-yum

Definition of thrum in:

Share this entry

 

There are 2 main definitions of thrum in English:

Share this entry

thrum 2 Syllabification: thrum

noun

1(In weaving) an unwoven end of a warp thread, or a fringe of such ends, left in the loom when the finished cloth is cut away.
Example sentences
  • The new yarn is fastened to the old thrum, the ends being united.
  • Dana made thrum-catcher bags to place by loom and collect little scraps of fiber or yarn for garnetting.
1.1Any short loose thread.
Example sentences
  • Dingfa automatic brushing machine is designed to clean the leftover thrum on fabrics

verb (thrums, thrumming, thrummed)

[with object] Back to top  
Cover or adorn (cloth or clothing) with ends of thread.
Example sentences
  • The red sash of royalty is made of net work, and thrummed with red and yellow feathers.
  • Llama and alpaca yarn is used to make these beautiful mittens which are thrummed with 100% alpaca rovings.

Derivatives

thrummer

1
Pronunciation: /ˈTHrəmər/
noun
Example sentences
  • Then I called Mum for mitten support - she's a seasoned thrummer - and she said, she double dips as well with the Fleece Artist roving.

thrummy

2
Pronunciation: /ˈTHrəmē/
adjective

Origin

Old English thrum (only in tungethrum 'ligament of the tongue'): of Germanic origin; related to Dutch dreum 'thrum' and German Trumm 'endpiece'. The current sense dates from Middle English.

Definition of thrum in:

Share this entry

 

What do you find interesting about this word or phrase?

Comments that don't adhere to our Community Guidelines may be moderated or removed.

Get more from Oxford Dictionaries

Subscribe to remove ads and access premium resources