There are 2 definitions of toll in English:

toll1

Syllabification: toll
Pronunciation: /tōl
 
/

noun

1A charge payable for permission to use a particular bridge or road: turnpike tolls [as modifier]: a toll bridge
More example sentences
  • Local governments throughout China have increasingly been using tolls on roads and bridges as a means of supplementing their income.
  • Nobody should be surprised by the Government's plans for road tolls, but I, for one, have been shocked by the reaction from some quarters of the fleet industry.
  • The goal of this project is to shift discretionary traffic out of the peak period by reducing the existing tolls on two bridges during the shoulder times before and after the morning and evening rush-hour peaks.
Synonyms
1.1North American A charge for a long-distance telephone call.
More example sentences
  • A lot of its advocates propose that Internet telephony avoids the tolls charged generated from traditional telephone service.
  • Another complaint is that with conventional long distance toll charges falling, the cost savings are not really significant.
2 [in singular] The number of deaths, casualties, or injuries arising from particular circumstances, such as a natural disaster, conflict, or accident: the toll of dead and injured mounted
More example sentences
  • People want measures to reduce the toll of accidents, deaths and serious injuries that occur with alarming regularity on the A64.
  • Last year, West Yorkshire recorded a toll of 102 deaths and serious injuries, the lowest number since records began 35 years ago.
  • It is believed some children are still being held - more than 400 have been rescued, but the death and casualty toll varies wildly.
Synonyms
number, count, tally, total, sum total, grand total, sum; record, list
2.1The cost or damage resulting from something: the environmental toll of the policy has been high
More example sentences
  • Even those costs shrivel beside the environmental toll.
  • And veterans of all ages continue to die at epidemic rates from suicides and other effects of the mental toll their wartime experiences took.
  • At the end of life, pain can exact a terrible toll through its direct effect on the patient and the fear it instills in both the patient and the family members.
Synonyms
adverse effect(s), detriment, harm, damage, injury, impact, hurt; cost, price, loss, disadvantage, suffering, penalty

verb

[with object] (usually as noun tolling) Back to top  
Charge a toll for the use of (a bridge or road): the report advocates expressway tolling
More example sentences
  • They are also relaxed about the prospect of tolling the new road.
  • He also concurred with the association's view that tolling the second bridge would result in up to 30% of road users avoiding the bridge so as not to pay the charge.
  • A spokesperson said that no decision had been taken on tolling the new bypass.

Origin

Old English (denoting a charge, tax, or duty), from medieval Latin toloneum, alteration of late Latin teloneum, from Greek telōnion 'tollhouse', from telos 'tax'. sense 2 of the noun (late 19th century) arose from the notion of paying a toll or tribute in human lives (to an adversary or to death).

Phrases

take its toll (or take a heavy toll)

Have an adverse effect, especially so as to cause damage, suffering, or death: years of pumping iron have taken their toll on his body
More example sentences
  • Stress took its toll and the weight began to drop off.
  • As the two ten minute periods of extra time began it was obvious that the heavy ground was taking its toll on both teams.
  • As he gets closer, his burden gets heavier and takes its toll on both his mind and body.

Definition of toll in:

Get more from Oxford Dictionaries

Subscribe to remove ads and access premium resources

Word of the day fungible
Pronunciation: ˈfənjəbəl
adjective
mutually interchangeable...

There are 2 definitions of toll in English:

toll2

Syllabification: toll
Pronunciation: /tōl
 
/

verb

1(With reference to a bell) sound or cause to sound with a slow, uniform succession of strokes, as a signal or announcement: [no object]: the bells of the cathedral began to toll for evening service [with obj]: the priest began tolling the bell
More example sentences
  • Today the bell will toll for the last time at Chippenham Livestock Market when the final beast goes up for sale.
  • Presently, the Church bell began to toll, signalling that the nightly curfew was about to begin.
  • He quickly seated himself as a bell tolled, signaling the start of class.
1.1(Of a bell) announce or mark (the time, a service, or a person’s death): the bell of St. Mary’s began to toll the curfew
More example sentences
  • Livra's words had set a bell tolling the death knell in the king's head.
  • Finally just as fashion had contributed to the rise of hairwork, so did it toll its death knell.
  • The rising share of foreign businesses in China's delivery market could toll the demise of less prepared domestic carriers

noun

[in singular] Back to top  
A single ring of a bell.
More example sentences
  • Even after he had heard the toll of the bell ring, it took him another full minute to safely retrieve his finger.
  • An album of cinema-flavoured music, it opens with a single, western-style bell toll.
  • It was a beautiful sound, almost like the echo of a bell toll.

Origin

late Middle English: probably a special use of dialect toll 'drag, pull'.

Definition of toll in: