Definition of tortuous in English:

tortuous

Syllabification: tor·tu·ous
Pronunciation: /ˈtôrCHo͞oəs
 
/

adjective

Derivatives

tortuosity

Pronunciation: /ˌtôrCHo͞oˈäsitē/
noun (plural tortuosities)
More example sentences
  • The permeance is a composite quantity consisting of the diffusion coefficient, the partition coefficient, the membrane thickness, and the tortuosity of the diffusional path length.
  • The tortuosity of the cytosol, due to the presence of t-tubules and mitochondria, will increase the effective distance Na has to travel from one compartment to the other and thus might reduce the apparent D Na.
  • Thus the main diffusion hindrance for these molecules should be the tortuosity of the diffusion path.

tortuously

adverb
tortuously twisting logic
More example sentences
  • The way that capitalism shifts money from place to place, account to account, in order to make it work for the investor often is tortuously complicated.
  • The only way to reach it is by two-lane roads, most of which twist tortuously through the scenic coastal mountain range or along the rocky Pacific coast.
  • The first sign of life is a tiny vehicle, winding its way tortuously along the thin white thread of a dirt road snaking through the rocky terrain.

tortuousness

noun
More example sentences
  • A focal stenosis on a straight artery without proximal vessel tortuousness or involvement of major side branches is ideal for percutaneous intervention.
  • Murrayfield's media centre, the usual home for the tautology and tortuousness of Scottish rugby-speak, was never like this.
  • The tortuousness of the judiciary, however frustrating it is, does not mutate him from suspect to terrorist.

Origin

late Middle English: via Old French from Latin tortuosus, from tortus 'twisting, a twist', from Latin torquere 'to twist'.

Usage

On the difference between tortuous and torturous, see torturous (usage).

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