There are 2 main definitions of twit in English:

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twit 1

Syllabification: twit

noun

informal
A silly or foolish person.
Example sentences
  • Both camps, according to White House insiders, are silly twits.
  • He thought of them as the lowest of low in the class known as CTJN class, the ‘creeps, twits, jerks and nerds’ class.
  • While I'd seen my fair share of mediocre upper middle-class twits leapfrog their contemporaries, I really believed that the results-driven media game was largely a meritocracy.

Derivatives

twittish

1
Pronunciation: /ˈtwidiSH/
adjective
Example sentences
  • Those who report on Washington, write columns or work on editorials are among the most twittish.
  • I think what you didn't realize is how twittish and silly your non-helpful post is in a group like this.
  • By the way, since you responded: Shall I take this as a sign that you are a twittish loser?

Origin

1930s (earlier dialect, in the sense 'talebearer'): perhaps from twit2.

More
  • The kind of twit that is a silly or foolish person dates only from the 1930s and comes from an English dialect use that meant ‘a tale-bearer’. It may come from twit in the sense ‘to tease or taunt someone, especially in a good-humoured way’, which is a shortening of Old English ætwītan ‘reproach with’.

Words that rhyme with twit

acquit, admit, backlit, bedsit, befit, bit, Brit, Britt, chit, commit, demit, dit, emit, fit, flit, frit, git, grit, hit, intermit, it, kit, knit, legit, lickety-split, lit, manumit, mishit, mitt, nit, omit, outsit, outwit, permit, pit, Pitt, pretermit, quit, remit, retrofit, sit, skit, slit, snit, spit, split, sprit, squit, submit, transmit, whit, wit, writ, zit

Definition of twit in:

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There are 2 main definitions of twit in English:

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twit 2 Syllabification: twit
dated

verb (twits, twitting, twitted)

[with object]
Tease or taunt (someone), especially in a good-humored way.
Example sentences
  • This was young Gene Siskel, twitting his rival, later partner-rival, Ebert.
  • Annoyance with prevailing trendy social morality can provide some basis too, not to mention some pleasure at twitting what is seen as a ‘politically correct’ liberal establishment.
  • I twitted Don gently because both Denise and Robert had some harsh words for him in their letters.

noun

[in singular] Back to top  
A state of nervous excitement: we’re in a twit about your visit

Origin

Old English ætwītan 'reproach with', from æt 'at' + wītan 'to blame'.

More
  • The kind of twit that is a silly or foolish person dates only from the 1930s and comes from an English dialect use that meant ‘a tale-bearer’. It may come from twit in the sense ‘to tease or taunt someone, especially in a good-humoured way’, which is a shortening of Old English ætwītan ‘reproach with’.

Definition of twit in:

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