There are 3 definitions of verge in English:

verge1

Syllabification: verge
Pronunciation: /vərj
 
/

noun

1An edge or border: they came down to the verge of the lake
More example sentences
  • The flat verges were littered with seaweed and plastic flotsam.
1.1An extreme limit beyond which something specified will happen: I was on the verge of tears
More example sentences
  • But his centuries-old livelihood is on the verge of collapse since the areca nut price has crashed beyond imagination.
  • An extremely competent golfer, Alf was on the verge of turning professional at one time.
  • Health bosses are believed to be on the verge of producing a new document outlining the fate of Ilkley's Coronation Hospital.
Synonyms
brink, threshold, edge, point
1.2British A grass edging such as that by the side of a road or path.
More example sentences
  • In north Norfolk we are used to the dramatic appearance of a Barn Owl as it hunts the road side verges searching for small rodents.
  • These days the Trace is a bitumen road, grass verges neatly manicured and mowed for mile after funereal mile.
  • The dog, nicknamed John, appeared on the grass verge by the side of the road in the main street through the village.
1.3 Architecture An edge of tiles projecting over a gable.
More example sentences
  • The poor condition of that tiling and the defective mortar to the verge tiling generally warranted further investigation, in Mr Bruce's opinion.
  • Only if society is on the verge of collapse can a communist revolution succeed.

verb

[no object] (verge on) Back to top  
Approach (something) closely; be close or similar to (something): despair verging on the suicidal
More example sentences
  • ‘The Arabs have been driven into a state verging on despair; and the present unrest is no more than an expression of that despair’.
  • Stuart MacGill, Warne's replacement, is a perfectly-good bowler, but he struggled, so much so that his body language often verged on despair.
Synonyms
approach, border on, come close/near to, be tantamount to; tend toward, approximate to, resemble

Origin

late Middle English: via Old French from Latin virga 'rod'. The current verb sense dates from the late 18th century.

Definition of verge in:

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Word of the day glee
Pronunciation: glē
noun
great delight

There are 3 definitions of verge in English:

verge2

Syllabification: verge
Pronunciation: /
 
vərj/

noun

A wand or rod carried before a bishop or dean as an emblem of office.
More example sentences
  • ‘I will carry on looking after the verges until they (the council) shoot me,’ he said.

Origin

late Middle English: from Latin virga 'rod'.

Definition of verge in:

There are 3 definitions of verge in English:

verge3

Syllabification: verge
Pronunciation: /
 
vərj/

verb

[no object]
Incline in a certain direction or toward a particular state: his style verged into the art nouveau school
More example sentences
  • ‘We are fast verging toward anarchy and confusion,’ he wrote.
  • If that were so, it would be tempting to dismiss these poems as mere word-play, verging toward nonsense.
  • If full, then verge south of start, lots down at Bonfield Gill half a mile from start.

Origin

early 17th century (in the sense 'descend (to the horizon)'): from Latin vergere 'to bend, incline'.

Definition of verge in: