Definition of violet in English:

violet

Syllabification: vi·o·let
Pronunciation: /ˈvī(ə)lət
 
/

noun

1A herbaceous plant of temperate regions, typically having purple, blue, or white five-petaled flowers, one of which forms a landing pad for pollinating insects.
  • Genus Viola, family Violaceae (the violet family): many species, including the dog violet and sweet violet . See also viola2
More example sentences
  • Colourful wild flowers sprung up by the roadside, purple violets and white daisies dotted among the grass.
  • Purple hyacinths and blue violets arranged together, the colors working together nicely.
  • There were pools that dreamed black and unruffled, there were a few white lilies, crocuses and violets; purple or pale, snake-like frittilaries.
1.1Used in names of similar-flowered plants of other families, e.g., African violet.
More example sentences
  • Bird's-Foot (V. pedata) violets are similar to Confederate violets in that they have no runners.
  • Erythronium dens-canis is the true dog's tooth violet, the name comes from the shape of the corm, and has rose coloured flowers on 10 cm stems and purple marked leaves.
  • You may put your African violet on a self-watering system to ensure a constant, optimum level of moisture.
2A bluish-purple color seen at the end of the spectrum opposite red.
More example sentences
  • He was splendidly dressed in the royal scarlet and bluish violet.
  • Except for one large canvas dependent on scrabbled zones of shockingly clear violet, most of the paintings are a little murky.
  • Now, it was not a bluish sort of violet, but pure, clear purple.

adjective

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Of a purplish-blue color.
More example sentences
  • He had a mess of shaggy violet colored hair and violet eyes that shone with a mixture of childish curiosity and animal-like awareness.
  • In Ricochet, he scatters an array of ellipses-with-trails in a multitude of colors over a plummy violet ground.
  • His scales were a dark violet color; they shone brilliantly in the firelight.

Origin

Middle English: from Old French violette, diminutive of viole, from Latin viola 'violet'.

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