Definition of voluble in English:

voluble

Syllabification: vol·u·ble
Pronunciation: /ˈvälyəbəl
 
/

adjective

Derivatives

volubleness

noun
More example sentences
  • He gave the language fixity, volubleness, grace, beauty, simplicity, and directness.

volubly

adverb
More example sentences
  • Every single morning newspaper and all the weeklies were spread on the kitchen table, with Bernard alternately lapsing into rage, disgust, amazement, or amusement, all volubly shared with me.
  • Of course, in order to be taken seriously as a scholar while you do much more than your colleagues in the public arena, much more volubly, you must also maintain enormous intellectual credibility.
  • I've always wondered why the people I know who are most into computers seem to be the ones who are most likely to swear at them volubly.

Origin

late 16th century: from French, or from Latin volubilis, from volvere 'to roll'. Earlier use in late Middle English included the senses 'rotating around an axis' and 'having a tendency to change', also meanings of the Latin word.

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Pronunciation: skōSH
noun
a small amount; a little