There are 4 main definitions of WAG in English:

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WAG1

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Entry from British & World English dictionary

noun

informal
A wife or girlfriend of a sports player, typically characterized as having a high media profile and a glamorous lifestyle.

Origin

early 21st century: from the acronym WAGs 'wives and girlfriends'.

Definition of WAG in:

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There are 4 main definitions of WAG in English:

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WAG2

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Entry from British & World English dictionary

abbreviation

Gambia (international vehicle registration).

Origin

from West Africa Gambia.

Definition of WAG in:

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There are 4 main definitions of WAG in English:

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wag3

Syllabification: wag
Pronunciation: /waɡ
 
/

verb (wags, wagging, wagged)

1(With reference to an animal’s tail) move or cause to move rapidly to and fro: [no object]: his tail began to wag [with object]: the dog went out, wagging its tail
More example sentences
  • Then I come back, and the tails wag so hard that it begins with the middle of their dog bodies.
  • Apparently tails are wagging over the show, as it has been renewed for another season.
  • The climbers soon ski up to us, red plastic sleds wagging like tails behind them.
Synonyms
swing, swish, switch, sway, shake, quiver, twitch, whip, bob
informal waggle
1.1 [with object] Move (an upward-pointing finger) from side to side to signify a warning or reprimand: she wagged a finger at Elinor
More example sentences
  • The others looked at him, and he raised one hand to wag an index finger under Kaeritha's nose.
  • Instead wag a disapproving finger at the bull run in commodities.
  • Siya pretended to be disappointed and wagged her finger at Mel.
Synonyms
shake, wave, wiggle, waggle, flourish, brandish
1.2 [no object] (Used of a tongue, jaw, or chin, as representing a person) talk, especially in order to gossip or spread rumors: this is a small island, and tongues are beginning to wag
More example sentences
  • Today an update on the shirtless shopper incident that has got quite a few chins wagging and a lot of discussion about what is acceptable and what is not in the way of dress in public.
  • I think I'll silence that wagging tongue of hers right now!
  • It was the presence of retired and pregnant singer Sinead O'Connor on stage with Damien Dempsey that got chins wagging.

noun

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A single rapid movement from side to side: a chirpy wag of the head
More example sentences
  • She looked up at him sadly, acknowledging his gesture with a half wag of her tail.
  • No matter how many Chechens may be slaughtered, we content ourselves with a polite wag of the finger, shrug our shoulders, then concede that massacre is an internal matter.
  • But the crowning glory is when the pointer turns around and gives an approving look and tail wag before he trots off to pick up another bird.

Origin

Middle English (as a verb): from the Germanic base of Old English wagian 'to sway'.

More
  • The sort of wagging done by dogs is from the Old English word wagian ‘to sway’, source also of waggle (late 16th century). Wangle (late 19th century) is first recorded as printers' slang. The origin is unknown but is perhaps based on waggle. Wag meaning ‘a joker’ is a different word, dating from the 16th century, which first meant ‘a mischievous boy or lively young man’, and was often used as a fond name for a child. Showing the grim gallows humour of the times, it probably comes from waghalter, ‘a person likely to be hanged’. In the 2006 World Cup a new meaning of wag suddenly became popular. The WAGs were the Wives and Girlfriends of the England players. The term had already been used in the 2004 European Championship.

Phrases

how the world wags

1
dated How affairs are going or being conducted.
Example sentences
  • And because we know that this is how the world wags - that even the least networked of us is connected to everyone if he is connected to at least one other person.
  • The second stage knows how the world wags but not why.
  • I want you to be curious about how the world wags its tail in different lands.

the tail wags the dog

2
see tail1.

Words that rhyme with wag

bag, blag, brag, Bragg, crag, dag, drag, fag, flag, gag, hag, jag, lag, mag, nag, quag, rag, sag, scrag, shag, slag, snag, sprag, stag, swag, tag, zag

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There are 4 main definitions of WAG in English:

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wag4

Syllabification: wag
Pronunciation: /waɡ
 
/

noun

dated
A person who makes facetious jokes.
Example sentences
  • Janey was sure that it was a joke by the wags in the Forensics labs - well reasonably sure.
  • At one point a wag from the crowd shouted ‘Is there a footballer in the house?’
  • Some wags joked that the ‘9 on Nine’ panel looked like some sort of reality television show.

Origin

mid 16th century (denoting a young man or mischievous boy, also used as a term of endearment to an infant): probably from obsolete waghalter 'person likely to be hanged' (see wag1, halter).

More
  • The sort of wagging done by dogs is from the Old English word wagian ‘to sway’, source also of waggle (late 16th century). Wangle (late 19th century) is first recorded as printers' slang. The origin is unknown but is perhaps based on waggle. Wag meaning ‘a joker’ is a different word, dating from the 16th century, which first meant ‘a mischievous boy or lively young man’, and was often used as a fond name for a child. Showing the grim gallows humour of the times, it probably comes from waghalter, ‘a person likely to be hanged’. In the 2006 World Cup a new meaning of wag suddenly became popular. The WAGs were the Wives and Girlfriends of the England players. The term had already been used in the 2004 European Championship.

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