Definition of wretch in English:

wretch

Syllabification: wretch
Pronunciation: /reCH
 
/

noun

1An unfortunate or unhappy person: can the poor wretch’s corpse tell us anything?
More example sentences
  • I asked Miss D' Lish to send us a little info to help out those unfortunate wretches who might not be familiar with her life and work.
  • How I pity the unhappy wretches who are doomed to dwell in such a place!
  • Will your readers kindly give just one moment's thought in comparing with their own, who are well fed, clothed, housed and cared for, the poor wretches I have described?
Synonyms
poor creature, poor soul, poor thing, poor unfortunate
informal poor devil
1.1 informal A despicable or contemptible person: ungrateful wretches
More example sentences
  • And I imagine that you hold yourself above those despicable wretches?
  • Except that this time we know he's not an ungrateful wretch; he's just a little happier than when we met him, and so are we.
  • My hits did go up to about 200 since yesterday so why am I being an ungrateful wretch?
Synonyms
scoundrel, villain, rogue, rascal, reprobate, criminal, miscreant, good-for-nothing
informal heel, creep, louse, rat, swine, dog, lowlife, scumbag, scumbucket, scuzzball, sleazeball, sleazebag
informal, archaic blackguard, picaroon

Origin

Old English wrecca (also in the sense 'banished person'); related to German Recke 'warrior, hero', also to the verb wreak.

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