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Russell's paradox

Line breaks: Russell's para|dox

Definition of Russell's paradox in English:

noun

A logical paradox stated in terms of set theory, concerning the set of all sets that do not contain themselves as members, namely that the condition for it to contain itself is that it should not contain itself.
Example sentences
  • For to do so leads inevitably to a logical contradiction via a version of Russell's paradox.
  • Wittgenstein studied the work of Frege and Russell closely, and in 1911, he wrote to both of them concerning his own solution to Russell's paradox.
  • In light of antinomies like Russell's paradox, there was no certainty that the set theory was even consistent.

Origin

1920s: named after Bertrand Russell (see Russell, Bertrand).

Definition of Russell's paradox in:

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