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abhor

Line breaks: abhor
Pronunciation: /əbˈhɔː
 
/

Definition of abhor in English:

verb (abhors, abhorring, abhorred)

[with object]
Regard with disgust and hatred: he abhorred sexism in every form
More example sentences
  • Healthcare professionals abhor politicians' interference in the NHS.
  • It also means sitting down with someone, someone who is not abhorred or hated, to have a conversation.
  • However, it obviously cannot involve either, because the university is famously progressive, and hence abhors both sins.

Origin

late Middle English: from Latin abhorrere, from ab- 'away from' + horrere 'to shudder'.

More
  • Abhor literally means something that makes you shudder. It comes from Latin ab- ‘away from’ and horrere ‘to shudder with fright’, also the basis of horror. In Shakespeare's day abhor could also mean ‘to cause horror’: ‘It does abhor me now I speak the word’ (Othello).

Derivatives

abhorrer

1
noun
Example sentences
  • Watchers are notorious pencil sharpeners, ribbon changers, plant waterers, home repairers and abhorrers of messy rooms or messy pages.
  • Your enemies and abhorrers look on with mild amusement.
  • Allowing companies to choose their compliancy would satisfy both adorers and abhorrers of the law.

Definition of abhor in:

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