Definition of abjure in English:

abjure

Line breaks: ab¦jure
Pronunciation: /əbˈdʒʊə
 
, əbˈdʒɔː/

verb

[with object] formal

Phrases

abjure the realm

historical Swear an oath to leave a country forever: prior to transportation, offenders were sometimes permitted to abjure the realm
More example sentences
  • If the accused would neither submit to trial nor abjure the realm after 40 days, he was starved into submission.
  • Adam and the others fled to the Church of Branscombe, confessed their crime, and abjured the realm before the coroner.
  • He would be sentenced to abjure the realm or suffer death as a felon.

Derivatives

abjuration

noun
More example sentences
  • The dramatic crisis stems from Galileo's enforced abjuration in 1633 of his belief in a heliocentric universe.
  • The Inquisition had accepted Cardano's private abjuration, extracting a promise from him never to teach or publish in the Papal States again.
  • Who speaks these terrible abjurations, Kafka the man or Kafka the artist?

Origin

late Middle English: from Latin abjurare, from ab- 'away' + jurare 'swear'.

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