Definition of allotropy in English:

allotropy

Line breaks: al¦lot|ropy
Pronunciation: /əˈlɒtrəpi
 
/

noun

[mass noun] Chemistry
  • The existence of two or more different physical forms of a chemical element.
    More example sentences
    • With the exception of nitrogen, all group V elements show allotropy.
    • An example of allotropy is carbon, which can exist as diamond, graphite, and amorphous carbon.
    • The best known example for allotropy is iron.

Derivatives

allotropic

Pronunciation: /aləˈtrɒpɪk/
adjective
More example sentences
  • Synthetic diamonds are produced by forcing an allotropic transition from graphite to diamond under conditions of extremely high temperature and mechanical pressure over a period of several days or weeks.
  • Manganese exists in four allotropic forms, the most common of which is stable to a temperature of about 1,300°F.
  • Graphite is one of the four allotropic forms of carbon; the other three are amorphous carbon, diamond, and fullerene.

Origin

mid 19th century: from Greek allotropos 'of another form', from allo- 'other' + tropos 'manner' (from trepein 'to turn').

More definitions of allotropy

Definition of allotropy in:

Get more from Oxford Dictionaries

Subscribe to remove ads and access premium resources

Word of the day coloratura
Pronunciation: ˌkələrəˈto͝orə
noun
elaborate ornamentation of a vocal melody