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ankle

Line breaks: ankle
Pronunciation: /ˈaŋk(ə)l
 
/

Definition of ankle in English:

noun

1The joint connecting the foot with the leg: Jennie fell downstairs, breaking her ankle [as modifier]: an ankle injury
More example sentences
  • Lateral ligament injuries to the ankle joint are common among athletes.
  • These two bones together link the leg to the foot at the ankle joint, although it is the tibia which carries all the weight.
  • She leapt to her feet and immediately had to jump to avoid a swipe of her master's pole that would have broken both her ankles had it connected.
1.1The narrow part of the leg between the ankle joint and the calf: her slim ankles
More example sentences
  • Your front thigh should be parallel to the floor and your calf straight above your ankle; your back leg should be almost to the floor.
  • The pump fills the sleeves with air and gently squeezes the leg, squeezing from ankle to calf to thigh.
  • He stood between her legs and casually played with her feet and calves, holding her ankles, running his fingertips up the backs of her legs.

verb

[no object] Back to top  
1 [with adverbial of direction] US informal Walk: we can ankle off to a new locale
More example sentences
  • Being sensible people, we ankled in and got a table.
  • We both ankled out of the theatre once Udo Kier was up there making love.
1.1 [with object] Leave: he ankled the series to do a movie
More example sentences
  • John Willis has ankled his post as Granada Medias managing director for worldwide production.
  • Fox Broadcasting marketing chief Roberta Mell has ankled her post.
  • Kirk Douglas had originally been cast as Trautman, but he ankled the project when the producers refused to cave in to Douglas' demand that Trautman kill Rambo in the finale.
2 (usually as noun ankling) Flex the ankles while cycling in order to increase pedalling efficiency: changing my pedalling style from toeing to ankling
More example sentences
  • Can someone please help me to understand "ankling" and whether it is a desirable way to pedal, i.e. does ankling provide a more "rounded" pedal stroke?
  • A method of pedaling known as 'ankling', or Anquetil's method, was popular in the 1960's and was thought to be the solution to cycling efficiency.
  • Ankling is an effective pedaling technique on level roads and slopes when riding at an average speed of around 20 km/h.

Origin

Old English ancleow, of Germanic origin; superseded in Middle English by forms from Old Norse; related to Dutch enkel and German Enkel, from an Indo-European root shared by angle1.

More
  • angle from (Old English):

    The angle meaning ‘the space between two intersecting lines’ and the one meaning ‘to fish with a rod and line’, or ‘to prompt someone to offer something’ are different words. The first comes from Latin angulus ‘corner’ and the second is an Old English word from ancient Germanic roots. The Angles were a people who migrated to England from Germany during the 5th century and founded kingdoms in the Midlands and East Anglia, eventually giving their name to England and the English. They came from the district of Angul, on the long, curved peninsula that is now called Schleswig-Holstein, and are thought to have got their name because the area was shaped like a fish hook—angle is also an old name for a hook. The ankle (Old English), the bend in the leg, goes back to the same Indo-European root as angle.

Derivatives

ankled

1
adjective
Example sentences
  • This article covers the crossed-ankled sitting position.
  • So in one night Zeus shared the bed and love of the neat-ankled daughter of Electyron and fulfilled his desire.
  • Where art thou gone, light-ankled youth?

Words that rhyme with ankle

rankle

Definition of ankle in:

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