Definition of apogee in English:

apogee

Line breaks: apo¦gee
Pronunciation: /ˈapədʒiː
 
/

noun

1The highest point in the development of something; a climax or culmination: a film which was the apogee of German expressionist cinema
More example sentences
  • Perhaps the apogee of the anti-globalisation movement came during the Group of Eight Meeting in Genoa in the third week of July, when some 300,000 people marched in the face of police tear-gas attacks.
  • If the United States, the richest country in the world at the apogee of its own wealth, does not take the lead, the rest of the world will not follow.
  • ‘The Oscars are the apogee of the awards season - after that, no one is interested,’ said one UK distributor.
2 Astronomy The point in the orbit of the moon or a satellite at which it is furthest from the earth. The opposite of perigee.
More example sentences
  • As the satellite rose up to the apogee of its orbit, the particle counts rose steadily until they reached the highest level, stayed at the maximum for a while, and then abruptly dropped to zero.
  • A few taps on the pocket calculator show that the Moon's speed in its geocentric orbit is around 2,300 miles per hour, although variable between perigee and apogee.
  • And later on when we once again stepped out into the night air, the three-quarter moon was past its apogee.

Origin

late 16th century: from French apogée or modern Latin apogaeum, from Greek apogaion (diastēma), '(distance) away from earth', from apo 'from' + gaia, 'earth'.

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