Definition of averse in English:

averse

Line breaks: averse
Pronunciation: /əˈvəːs
 
/

adjective

[predicative, usually with negative]
Having a strong dislike of or opposition to something: as a former CIA director, he is not averse to secrecy [in combination]: the bank’s approach has been risk-averse
More example sentences
  • Strong and aggressive, he is not averse to a bit of shirt pulling and uses his arms effectively to hold off defenders.
  • Now some of you may know that if an opportunity arises of a little fun with a person of the opposite sex I'm not averse, rare as it is.
  • Some will be risk averse, others close to retirement and unwilling to jeopardise their futures.
Synonyms

Origin

late 16th century: from Latin aversus 'turned away from', past participle of avertere (see avert).

Usage

1 On the confusion of averse and adverse, see adverse (usage)2 Traditionally, and according to Dr Johnson, averse from is preferred to averse to. The latter is condemned on etymological grounds (the Latin root translates as ‘turn from’). However, averse to is entirely consistent with ordinary usage in modern English (on the analogy of hostile to, disinclined to, etc.) and is part of normal standard English, while averse from is now very uncommon.

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