Definition of back door in English:

back door

Line breaks: back door

noun

1The rear door of a building.
More example sentences
  • They pushed open the back doors and entered the building, passing by the control room and up the concrete back stairs, heading for their changing rooms.
  • Bob pried open one of the back doors to the building, and they all scrambled out into the cool night air.
  • Veon threw open his door and opened the back doors, grabbing his pistols and stuffing them into his belt.
1.1 [as modifier] Achieved by using indirect or dishonest means: a back-door tax increase
More example sentences
  • The problem with such a ‘solution’, of course, is that it is a slightly dishonest, back-door way of achieving a result which accords with justice.
  • It is wrong, it is a back-door tax, and we totally disagree with it.
  • That is why the National Party opposes this ridiculous back-door tax.
1.2A feature or defect of a computer system that allows surreptitious unauthorized access to data.
More example sentences
  • Around the same time, Mydoom.A was infecting machines around the world, leaving a small backdoor to each infected computer.
  • Once downloaded, the victim unwittingly activates the backdoor by compiling Sendmail from source code.
  • It also attempts to open a backdoor on infected Windows PCs, allowing hackers to exploit compromised systems.

Phrases

by (or through) the back door

Using indirect or dishonest means to achieve an objective: this form of franchising will be seen as privatization by the back door
More example sentences
  • This is state sponsorship of campaigns to achieve political goals by the back door.
  • But, as the chairman explained, that might be good enough to achieve promotion by the back door.
  • It is obvious this shortfall will have to be paid by the taxpayer - through the back door, by council tax increases of ten per cent.

Definition of back door in:

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Pronunciation: ˈdīktik
adjective
denoting a word whose meaning depends on context...