There are 2 definitions of band in English:

band1

Line breaks: band
Pronunciation: /band
 
/

noun

1A flat, thin strip or loop of material, used as a fastener, for reinforcement, or as decoration: wads of banknotes fastened with gummed paper bands Victoria settled the velvet band on her hair
More example sentences
  • Looking at the side of the fan reveals a thin band of conductive material encircling the fan surround and connecting to the power cord.
  • Around my forehead was a thin blood red band of velvet material.
  • She slipped thin bands of stretchy brown material onto Brenna's braids.
Synonyms
belt, sash, girdle, strap, tape, ring, hoop, loop, circlet, circle, cord, tie, string, thong, ribbon, fillet, strip
literary cincture
1.1A plain ring for the finger, especially a gold wedding ring: a narrow band of gold was her only jewellery
More example sentences
  • After the vows are said, the Orthodox groom places a plain gold band on the ring finger of his bride's right hand.
  • He twirled the gold band, Helen's wedding ring, around on the tip of his little finger, before sliding it down to the knuckle.
  • A band of gold seals the wedding vows, and fifty years later the metal valorizes the most exalted anniversary of married bliss.
1.2 Ornithology, North American A ring of metal placed round a bird’s leg to identify it: look for a leg band on the osprey
More example sentences
  • We placed a metal band on one leg of each bird and a unique pair of colored bands on the other.
  • The numbers on the metal bands allowed us to identify individuals from distances up to 40 m.
  • We marked all birds with uniquely colored leg bands to permit individual identification.
1.3A belt or strap transmitting motion between two wheels or pulleys.
More example sentences
  • Much admired for his skill at carpentry, Tade made horses and donkeys carts and put bands on the wheels of carts.
  • Spool the band around the axle, place the racer on the floor and get ready for a speedy trip when you release the rear wheels.
  • Start with a pulley or elastic resistance band set at shoulder height.
1.4 (bands) A collar with two hanging strips, worn by certain lawyers, clerics, and academics as part of their formal dress: I’m wearing clerical bands, which are a sign of my office
More example sentences
  • There was a great accumulation of them near his clerical bands, on which the abundant folds of his red skin were resting.
  • The early colonists named it the “Parson bird,” in allusion to the peculiar tufts of white feathers that adorn its throat, and their fancied resemblance to the clerical bands.
  • As the Revolution developed, he became "a zealous Whig" who served in the Continental Congress, the only member who wore clerical bands in 1776.
2A stripe, line, or elongated area of a different colour, texture, or composition from its surroundings: a long, narrow band of cloud
More example sentences
  • The cloud bands move at different speeds, and their irregularities may be due to either the different motions between them or to disturbances below the visible cloud layer.
  • In usual Smart style, a contrasting band of colour surrounds the side doors.
  • The blue line intersecting the orange band of the 401 in the lower left indicates the ravine and the site of the crash.
Synonyms
stripe, strip, streak, line, bar, belt, swathe, vein, thread, flash
technical stria, striation, lane
2.1A narrow stratum of rock or coal: the band of limestone continues north on the same contour
More example sentences
  • These dates are only applicable to stage boundaries and no dates are available for marine bands and coals used to correlate sections at sub-stage level.
  • The volcano-sedimentary sequence is characterized by lava flows alternating with grey shales and occasional red chert bands.
  • What you see are just the edges of dykes and sills - narrow bands of rock where the stuff has poured into cracks in the surrounding rock and solidified.
3A range of values or a specified category within a series (used especially in financial contexts): your home was placed in one of eight valuation bands
More example sentences
  • The possible values of energy are found to lie within a series of bands.
  • Unless the currency's par value is changed suddenly, foreign exchange transactions are based on the existing par value and fluctuations within the specified bands.
  • It is also important to note that whereas women save more than men within specific income bands, women earn less than men, and therefore save less.
3.1A range of frequencies or wavelengths in a spectrum: channels in the UHF band
More example sentences
  • Quantum dots can be designed to fluoresce in a wide range of wavelength bands.
  • Multiple images of a single field-of-view are captured in more than three wavelength bands in this range.
  • Today's multiband antennas are physically too large to carry if they have to support a very wide range of frequency bands.
3.2Any of several groups into which school pupils of the same age are divided on the basis of broadly similar ability: the top band of pupils
More example sentences
  • All applicants to the school will take a test, with the children then divided into nine ability bands.
  • The results of this assessment divide pupils into five bands.
  • The top band is much closer to average earnings than it used to be.
4 archaic A thing that restrains, binds, or unites: must I fall, and die in bands?
More example sentences
  • He comes out bound with bands and a cloth over his head.
  • I walked to the library slowly, as if shambling, for my heart is bound with iron bands like the faithful servant in that old tale.
  • In this context, the insistence we noted earlier on cutting the restraining bands upon the hands and feet of the deceased before interment has a clear significance.

verb

[with object] Back to top  
1Provide or fit (an object) with something in the form of a strip or ring, for reinforcement or decoration: doors are banded with iron to make them stronger
More example sentences
  • The outer edges of these Audi floor mats are coil-stitched and are not banded to provide endurance.
  • Across from him, there was a wooden door, banded with black iron.
1.1 Ornithology, North American Put a band on (a bird) for identification: the map shows where starlings banded in Holland were later recovered
More example sentences
  • Nearly all of these birds were banded as chicks or juveniles at or near breeding colonies.
  • Most birds are color banded for individual identification, and blood samples have been collected for all banded birds since 1990.
  • All birds were banded with a U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service aluminum band, and all adults were marked with unique combinations of colored leg bands for individual identification.
2Mark (something) with a stripe or stripes of a different colour: the bird’s bill is banded across the middle with black (as adjective banded) banded agate
More example sentences
  • Subtly impressive was the beautifully banded agate Mughal fly whisk handle, tipped with a garnet on an amber collar and inset with emeralds.
  • These are delicate, feathery to fuzzy-looking fingers and differ from the more stalactitic and concentrically banded forms that probably result from a different process.
  • The CD also contains a photo gallery of 54 ornamental fishes, especially the attractive and colourful varieties like Scarlet banded barb and Rosy barb.
3British Allocate to a range or category (used especially in financial contexts): single adults in a property banded above D will pay more
More example sentences
  • However, the Liberal Democrat member said residents in York should brace themselves for higher bills when banding levels based on 1991 house prices are finally overhauled.
  • Thousands of York residents were bracing themselves for higher bills following an overhaul of council tax banding levels, which are currently based on 1991 house prices.
  • The qualifying weekly income figure will be different for a lower or higher banded property.
3.1Group (school pupils) into classes or sets for teaching purposes: the infants are banded in terms of their ability

Origin

late Old English (in sense 4 of the noun), from Old Norse, reinforced in late Middle English by Old French bande, of Germanic origin; related to bind.

Definition of band in:

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Word of the day hubris
Pronunciation: ˈ(h)yo͞obris
noun
excessive pride or self-confidence

There are 2 definitions of band in English:

band2

Line breaks: band
Pronunciation: /band
 
/

noun

1A group of people who have a common interest or purpose or who share a common feature: a band of eminent British researchers
More example sentences
  • The band was divided into ten small groups, each covering a certain area of the city.
  • The whole of the Sikh army had been divided into bands, which were headed by a leader who was known as Jathedar.
  • The band was finally forced to surrender only 30 miles short of reaching safety in Canada.
Synonyms
group, gang, mob, pack, troop, troupe, company, party, bevy, crew, body, working party, posse; team, side, selection, line-up, array; gathering, crowd, horde, throng, assembly, assemblage; association, society, club, circle, fellowship, partnership, guild, lodge, order, fraternity, confraternity, brotherhood, sisterhood, sorority, union, alliance, affiliation, institution, league, federation, clique, set, coterie; squad, corps, cadre, contingent, detachment, unit, detail, patrol, army, cohort
informal bunch, gaggle
rare sodality
1.1 Anthropology A subgroup of a tribe: Philip was born a Shushwap Indian, part of the Little Shushwap band
More example sentences
  • Social mechanisms like marriage and exogamy ensured that individual bands, tribes, or clans operated within systems that extended over vast distances.
  • Tribes are larger than bands, numbering up to a few thousand people, and they tend to be settled farmers, though some are pastoralists with a mobile economy.
  • Some live in thriving communities, while others are just small tribes or bands.
2A small group of musicians and vocalists who play pop, jazz, or rock music: the band’s last two albums a local band
More example sentences
  • Meanwhile, the band are touring Britain on a heavy promotional tour.
  • Over the course of the last decade they have established themselves as one of the best live bands in the country.
  • In a photo from 1955, she is seen onstage around the time she made her first recordings with a local band.
2.1A group of musicians who play brass, wind, or percussion instruments: a military band
More example sentences
  • Whether they are Pipes & Drums or Brass & Reed bands, the musicians are there to support this grand event.
  • They have already lost the two leading musical instruments in the band.
  • Sibelius Instruments is a unique, interactive encyclopedia of instruments, bands, orchestras and ensembles.
3North American A herd or flock: moving bands of caribou
More example sentences
  • Through binoculars we saw great bands of caribou in the foothills to the south and east.
  • The herds and bands of elephants, horses, dancing girls and musicians, and scenes from the Ramayana come alive on the outer walls of the temple.
  • Relieved of the need to avoid predators, little bands of animals have not another single thing in their heads.

verb

[no object] Back to top  
(Of people or organizations) form a group to achieve a mutual objective: local people banded together to fight the company
More example sentences
  • A number of state and federal organizations have also banded together to host National Estuaries Day, meant to promote the importance of estuaries and the need to protect them.
  • A group of leading organizations have banded together to address the problem of minority underrepresentation in business and management education.
  • Charity organizations have banded together to introduce creative campaigns which improve the living standards of the poor in Thai society.
Synonyms
join (up), team up, join forces, pool resources, club together, get together, come together; collaborate, cooperate, work together, pull together; amalgamate, unite, form an alliance, form an association, combine, merge, affiliate, federate

Origin

late Middle English: from Old French bande, of Germanic origin; related to banner.

Definition of band in: