Definition of baroque in English:

baroque

Line breaks: bar|oque
Pronunciation: /bəˈrɒk
 
, -ˈrəʊk/

adjective

1Relating to or denoting a style of European architecture, music, and art of the 17th and 18th centuries that followed Mannerism and is characterized by ornate detail. In architecture the period is exemplified by the palace of Versailles and by the work of Wren in England. Major composers include Vivaldi, Bach, and Handel; Caravaggio and Rubens are important baroque artists.
More example sentences
  • Early eighteenth century baroque composer Vivaldi was a trained priest who had music in his heart.
  • The programme will include baroque concertos by Vivaldi, Bach and many more.
  • To sum up, this disc is a must for all choral enthusiasts who have the rich seam of 18th century baroque music at heart.
1.1Highly ornate and extravagant in style: the candles were positively baroque
More example sentences
  • He also earned the scorn of most of the UK when the couple sold pictures of their baroque wedding to a glossy magazine for #1 million.
  • Way beyond merely luxurious, the baroque decor is jaw-droppingly ostentatious.
  • If the Little Church is as Old Vegas as Sinatra at the Sands, the wedding chapels at Bellagio are as New Vegas as Celine Dion - extravagant, baroque.
Synonyms

noun

[mass noun] Back to top  
The baroque style or period: the interior of the church is in lavish baroque the sculptural group in Rome is a key work of the baroque
More example sentences
  • What were called ‘Chinoiserie’ styles of alleged Asian designs were in vogue for those who wanted a lighter alternative to the formality of baroque or neoclassicism.
  • Most big-ticket performers know their place, whether it be classical, baroque or grand opera.
  • Austrian architects created a distinctive national style, Austrian baroque, that featured irregular or undulating outlines, dynamic use of bold and delicate colors, and rich ornamentation.

Origin

mid 18th century: from French (originally designating a pearl of irregular shape), from Portuguese barroco, Spanish barrueco, or Italian barocco; of unknown ultimate origin.

Definition of baroque in:

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Pronunciation: ˌ(h)yo͞oməˈresk
noun
a short, lively piece of music